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[Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Hungary: endemic, food-borne zoonosis].
Orv Hetil. 2009 Mar 01; 150(9):415-21.OH

Abstract

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raises the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis.

AIM/METHODS

Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals by ELISA and RT-PCR in Hungary.

RESULTS

Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6%) human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5%) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two, 11 and 9 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7%; liver: 30.8%), roe-deer (liver: 34.4%) and wild boar (liver: 12.2%), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters.

CONCLUSIONS

HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastroenteralis Vírusok Nemzeti Referencia Laboratóriuma, ANTSZ Dél-dunántúli Regionális Intézete Regionális Virológiai Laboratórium Pécs Szabadság u. 7. 7623. reuter.gabor@baranya.antsz.huNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

hun

PubMed ID

19228570

Citation

Reuter, Gábor, et al. "[Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis E Virus in Hungary: Endemic, Food-borne Zoonosis]." Orvosi Hetilap, vol. 150, no. 9, 2009, pp. 415-21.
Reuter G, Fodor D, Forgách P, et al. [Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Hungary: endemic, food-borne zoonosis]. Orv Hetil. 2009;150(9):415-21.
Reuter, G., Fodor, D., Forgách, P., Kátai, A., & Szucs, G. (2009). [Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Hungary: endemic, food-borne zoonosis]. Orvosi Hetilap, 150(9), 415-21. https://doi.org/10.1556/OH.2009.28561
Reuter G, et al. [Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis E Virus in Hungary: Endemic, Food-borne Zoonosis]. Orv Hetil. 2009 Mar 1;150(9):415-21. PubMed PMID: 19228570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Hungary: endemic, food-borne zoonosis]. AU - Reuter,Gábor, AU - Fodor,Domonka, AU - Forgách,Petra, AU - Kátai,Andrea, AU - Szucs,György, PY - 2009/2/21/entrez PY - 2009/2/21/pubmed PY - 2009/4/11/medline SP - 415 EP - 21 JF - Orvosi hetilap JO - Orv Hetil VL - 150 IS - 9 N2 - UNLABELLED: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raises the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis. AIM/METHODS: Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals by ELISA and RT-PCR in Hungary. RESULTS: Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6%) human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5%) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two, 11 and 9 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7%; liver: 30.8%), roe-deer (liver: 34.4%) and wild boar (liver: 12.2%), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters. CONCLUSIONS: HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary. SN - 0030-6002 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19228570/[Molecular_epidemiology_of_hepatitis_E_virus_in_Hungary:_endemic_food_borne_zoonosis]_ L2 - https://akjournals.com/doi/10.1556/OH.2009.28561 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -