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View combination in moving objects: the role of motion in discriminating between novel views of similar and distinctive objects by humans and pigeons.
Vision Res. 2009 Mar; 49(6):594-607.VR

Abstract

Humans and pigeons were trained to discriminate between views of similar and distinctive objects that rotated in depth coherently or non-coherently. We tested novel views that were either moving or static and were either between the training viewpoints or beyond them. With both types of motion, both species recognized views between the training viewpoints better than views beyond this range. Additionally, for humans, and to some extent for pigeons, when similar objects were learned via coherent motion, dynamic cues facilitated recognition of viewpoints predictable from the direction of motion. Overall, the results suggest that dynamic information may be added to object representations for both species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9. alinda@ualberta.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19232366

Citation

Friedman, Alinda, et al. "View Combination in Moving Objects: the Role of Motion in Discriminating Between Novel Views of Similar and Distinctive Objects By Humans and Pigeons." Vision Research, vol. 49, no. 6, 2009, pp. 594-607.
Friedman A, Vuong QC, Spetch ML. View combination in moving objects: the role of motion in discriminating between novel views of similar and distinctive objects by humans and pigeons. Vision Res. 2009;49(6):594-607.
Friedman, A., Vuong, Q. C., & Spetch, M. L. (2009). View combination in moving objects: the role of motion in discriminating between novel views of similar and distinctive objects by humans and pigeons. Vision Research, 49(6), 594-607. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2009.01.019
Friedman A, Vuong QC, Spetch ML. View Combination in Moving Objects: the Role of Motion in Discriminating Between Novel Views of Similar and Distinctive Objects By Humans and Pigeons. Vision Res. 2009;49(6):594-607. PubMed PMID: 19232366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - View combination in moving objects: the role of motion in discriminating between novel views of similar and distinctive objects by humans and pigeons. AU - Friedman,Alinda, AU - Vuong,Quoc C, AU - Spetch,Marcia L, Y1 - 2009/02/14/ PY - 2008/08/25/received PY - 2009/01/26/revised PY - 2009/01/31/accepted PY - 2009/2/24/entrez PY - 2009/2/24/pubmed PY - 2010/3/27/medline SP - 594 EP - 607 JF - Vision research JO - Vision Res. VL - 49 IS - 6 N2 - Humans and pigeons were trained to discriminate between views of similar and distinctive objects that rotated in depth coherently or non-coherently. We tested novel views that were either moving or static and were either between the training viewpoints or beyond them. With both types of motion, both species recognized views between the training viewpoints better than views beyond this range. Additionally, for humans, and to some extent for pigeons, when similar objects were learned via coherent motion, dynamic cues facilitated recognition of viewpoints predictable from the direction of motion. Overall, the results suggest that dynamic information may be added to object representations for both species. SN - 1878-5646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19232366/View_combination_in_moving_objects:_the_role_of_motion_in_discriminating_between_novel_views_of_similar_and_distinctive_objects_by_humans_and_pigeons_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0042-6989(09)00042-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -