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Intimate partner violence and correlates in pregnant HIV positive Nigerians.
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2009 Nov; 280(5):745-52.AG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence, types and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) in pregnant Nigerian living with HIV.

DESIGN

Cross sectional study.

POPULATION

HIV positive pregnant women.

SETTING

A large HIV comprehensive treatment centre.

METHODS

A cross sectional study of 652 HIV positive pregnant Nigerians seen at Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria over a 24 months period.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Prevalence of intimate partner violence after HIV diagnosis.

RESULTS

Among the women interviewed, 423 (65.8%) reported abuse. In 74.0% of abused women, the abuse started after HIV diagnosis. Though having a HIV negative spouse and disclosure of HIV status were associated with abuse, only having a HIV negative partner retained its association with IPV (OR 3.1; CI 2.4-5.3) after controlling for confounding variables. Sixty-two (9.6%) women have not disclosed their HIV status because of fear of rejection. Verbal abuse (51.7%), threat of violence in 97 (22.9%) and sexual deprivation in 91 (21.5%) were the common forms of abuse reported.

CONCLUSION

IPV is common among HIV positive pregnant Nigerians; with a threefold increased risk in women in HIV serodiscordant relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, Clinical Sciences Division, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. oezechi@yahoo.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19242706

Citation

Ezechi, Oliver Chukwujekwu, et al. "Intimate Partner Violence and Correlates in Pregnant HIV Positive Nigerians." Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 280, no. 5, 2009, pp. 745-52.
Ezechi OC, Gab-Okafor C, Onwujekwe DI, et al. Intimate partner violence and correlates in pregnant HIV positive Nigerians. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2009;280(5):745-52.
Ezechi, O. C., Gab-Okafor, C., Onwujekwe, D. I., Adu, R. A., Amadi, E., & Herbertson, E. (2009). Intimate partner violence and correlates in pregnant HIV positive Nigerians. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 280(5), 745-52. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-009-0956-9
Ezechi OC, et al. Intimate Partner Violence and Correlates in Pregnant HIV Positive Nigerians. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2009;280(5):745-52. PubMed PMID: 19242706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence and correlates in pregnant HIV positive Nigerians. AU - Ezechi,Oliver Chukwujekwu, AU - Gab-Okafor,Chidinma, AU - Onwujekwe,Dan I, AU - Adu,Rosemary A, AU - Amadi,Eva, AU - Herbertson,Ebiere, Y1 - 2009/02/26/ PY - 2008/10/02/received PY - 2009/01/20/accepted PY - 2009/2/27/entrez PY - 2009/2/27/pubmed PY - 2010/1/29/medline SP - 745 EP - 52 JF - Archives of gynecology and obstetrics JO - Arch Gynecol Obstet VL - 280 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence, types and correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) in pregnant Nigerian living with HIV. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. POPULATION: HIV positive pregnant women. SETTING: A large HIV comprehensive treatment centre. METHODS: A cross sectional study of 652 HIV positive pregnant Nigerians seen at Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria over a 24 months period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of intimate partner violence after HIV diagnosis. RESULTS: Among the women interviewed, 423 (65.8%) reported abuse. In 74.0% of abused women, the abuse started after HIV diagnosis. Though having a HIV negative spouse and disclosure of HIV status were associated with abuse, only having a HIV negative partner retained its association with IPV (OR 3.1; CI 2.4-5.3) after controlling for confounding variables. Sixty-two (9.6%) women have not disclosed their HIV status because of fear of rejection. Verbal abuse (51.7%), threat of violence in 97 (22.9%) and sexual deprivation in 91 (21.5%) were the common forms of abuse reported. CONCLUSION: IPV is common among HIV positive pregnant Nigerians; with a threefold increased risk in women in HIV serodiscordant relationship. SN - 1432-0711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19242706/Intimate_partner_violence_and_correlates_in_pregnant_HIV_positive_Nigerians_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-009-0956-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -