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Does olfactory function improve after endoscopic sinus surgery?
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Mar; 140(3):312-9.OH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the impact of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) on olfactory impairment in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) over intermediate and long-term follow-up. We hypothesized that patients with mild olfactory dysfunction (hyposmia) would benefit from ESS, whereas patients with severe olfactory dysfunction (anosmia) would not.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective, multi-institutional cohort study.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A total of 111 patients presenting for ESS for treatment of CRS were examined preoperatively, and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Demographic, comorbidity, and Smell Identification Test (SIT) data were collected at each time point. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed.

RESULTS

The prevalence of gender-adjusted olfactory dysfunction prior to surgery was 67.5 percent. Surprisingly, hyposmic patients did not significantly improve after surgery. In contrast, patients with anosmia significantly improved after ESS (baseline, 6-month SIT scores: 9.7 +/- 2.0, 21.3 +/- 11.2; P = 0.001). Improvement was sustained at 12-month follow-up (21.7 +/- 10.7; P = 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that baseline olfactory category and nasal polyposis were significantly associated with improvement in postoperative olfactory function (P = 0.035, P = 0.002).

CONCLUSION

Contrary to our hypotheses, patients with severe olfactory dysfunction significantly improved after ESS and sustained improvement over time, whereas patients with mild olfactory dysfunction did not.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Rhinology and Sinus Surgery, Oregon Sinus Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19248934

Citation

Litvack, Jamie R., et al. "Does Olfactory Function Improve After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery?" Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 140, no. 3, 2009, pp. 312-9.
Litvack JR, Mace J, Smith TL. Does olfactory function improve after endoscopic sinus surgery? Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;140(3):312-9.
Litvack, J. R., Mace, J., & Smith, T. L. (2009). Does olfactory function improve after endoscopic sinus surgery? Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 140(3), 312-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2008.12.006
Litvack JR, Mace J, Smith TL. Does Olfactory Function Improve After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;140(3):312-9. PubMed PMID: 19248934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does olfactory function improve after endoscopic sinus surgery? AU - Litvack,Jamie R, AU - Mace,Jess, AU - Smith,Timothy L, PY - 2008/09/09/received PY - 2008/11/04/revised PY - 2008/12/01/accepted PY - 2009/3/3/entrez PY - 2009/3/3/pubmed PY - 2009/4/29/medline SP - 312 EP - 9 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 140 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) on olfactory impairment in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) over intermediate and long-term follow-up. We hypothesized that patients with mild olfactory dysfunction (hyposmia) would benefit from ESS, whereas patients with severe olfactory dysfunction (anosmia) would not. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multi-institutional cohort study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 111 patients presenting for ESS for treatment of CRS were examined preoperatively, and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Demographic, comorbidity, and Smell Identification Test (SIT) data were collected at each time point. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of gender-adjusted olfactory dysfunction prior to surgery was 67.5 percent. Surprisingly, hyposmic patients did not significantly improve after surgery. In contrast, patients with anosmia significantly improved after ESS (baseline, 6-month SIT scores: 9.7 +/- 2.0, 21.3 +/- 11.2; P = 0.001). Improvement was sustained at 12-month follow-up (21.7 +/- 10.7; P = 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that baseline olfactory category and nasal polyposis were significantly associated with improvement in postoperative olfactory function (P = 0.035, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Contrary to our hypotheses, patients with severe olfactory dysfunction significantly improved after ESS and sustained improvement over time, whereas patients with mild olfactory dysfunction did not. SN - 0194-5998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19248934/Does_olfactory_function_improve_after_endoscopic_sinus_surgery L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.otohns.2008.12.006?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -