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Lifetime psychiatric disorders and body composition: a population-based study.
J Affect Disord. 2009 Nov; 118(1-3):173-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study aimed to investigate the relationship between depressive and anxiety disorders and indices of adiposity, including body fat mass and percent body fat, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

METHODS

In this observational study of 979 randomly-selected women aged 20-93 years, psychiatric history was ascertained using a structured clinical interview (SCID-I/NP). Total body fat was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Medication use and lifestyle factors were self-reported.

RESULTS

Those with a lifetime history of depression had increased fat mass (+7.4%) and percent body fat (+4.3%), as well as greater mean weight (+3.3%), waist circumference (+2.9%) and BMI (+3.5%) after adjustment for age, anxiety, alcohol consumption, physical activity and past smoking. Furthermore, those meeting criteria for a lifetime history of depression had a 1.7-fold increased odds of being overweight or obese (BMI>or=25), a 2.0-fold increased odds of being obese (BMI>or=30) and a 1.8-fold increased odds of having a waist circumference >or=80 cm. These patterns persisted after further adjustment for psychotropic medication use, smoking status and energy intake. No differences in any measures of adiposity were observed among those with anxiety disorders compared to controls.

LIMITATIONS

There is potential for unrecognised confounding, interpretations are limited to women and a temporal relationship could not be inferred.

CONCLUSIONS

Depression was associated with greater adiposity. The difference in body fat mass was numerically greater than differences in indirect measures of adiposity, suggesting that the latter may underestimate the extent of adiposity in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, PO Box 281, Geelong 3220, Australia. lanaw@barwonhealth.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19249106

Citation

Williams, Lana J., et al. "Lifetime Psychiatric Disorders and Body Composition: a Population-based Study." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 118, no. 1-3, 2009, pp. 173-9.
Williams LJ, Pasco JA, Henry MJ, et al. Lifetime psychiatric disorders and body composition: a population-based study. J Affect Disord. 2009;118(1-3):173-9.
Williams, L. J., Pasco, J. A., Henry, M. J., Jacka, F. N., Dodd, S., Nicholson, G. C., Kotowicz, M. A., & Berk, M. (2009). Lifetime psychiatric disorders and body composition: a population-based study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 118(1-3), 173-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2009.02.001
Williams LJ, et al. Lifetime Psychiatric Disorders and Body Composition: a Population-based Study. J Affect Disord. 2009;118(1-3):173-9. PubMed PMID: 19249106.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lifetime psychiatric disorders and body composition: a population-based study. AU - Williams,Lana J, AU - Pasco,Julie A, AU - Henry,Margaret J, AU - Jacka,Felice N, AU - Dodd,Seetal, AU - Nicholson,Geoffrey C, AU - Kotowicz,Mark A, AU - Berk,Michael, Y1 - 2009/02/26/ PY - 2008/12/10/received PY - 2009/02/01/revised PY - 2009/02/02/accepted PY - 2009/3/3/entrez PY - 2009/3/3/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 173 EP - 9 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 118 IS - 1-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between depressive and anxiety disorders and indices of adiposity, including body fat mass and percent body fat, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. METHODS: In this observational study of 979 randomly-selected women aged 20-93 years, psychiatric history was ascertained using a structured clinical interview (SCID-I/NP). Total body fat was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Medication use and lifestyle factors were self-reported. RESULTS: Those with a lifetime history of depression had increased fat mass (+7.4%) and percent body fat (+4.3%), as well as greater mean weight (+3.3%), waist circumference (+2.9%) and BMI (+3.5%) after adjustment for age, anxiety, alcohol consumption, physical activity and past smoking. Furthermore, those meeting criteria for a lifetime history of depression had a 1.7-fold increased odds of being overweight or obese (BMI>or=25), a 2.0-fold increased odds of being obese (BMI>or=30) and a 1.8-fold increased odds of having a waist circumference >or=80 cm. These patterns persisted after further adjustment for psychotropic medication use, smoking status and energy intake. No differences in any measures of adiposity were observed among those with anxiety disorders compared to controls. LIMITATIONS: There is potential for unrecognised confounding, interpretations are limited to women and a temporal relationship could not be inferred. CONCLUSIONS: Depression was associated with greater adiposity. The difference in body fat mass was numerically greater than differences in indirect measures of adiposity, suggesting that the latter may underestimate the extent of adiposity in this population. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19249106/Lifetime_psychiatric_disorders_and_body_composition:_a_population_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(09)00071-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -