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Making an IMPACT: effect of a school-based pilot intervention.
N C Med J. 2008 Nov-Dec; 69(6):432-40.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Poor nutrition and inactivity are widespread and contribute to the epidemic problem of childhood obesity. This study examined the effectiveness of a school-based pilot program to improve nutrition and activity in elementary (ES) and high school (HS) students.

METHODS

The Improving Meals and Physical Activity in Children and Teens (IMPACT) school-based curriculum used a train-the-trainer model to improve activity and nutrition. Nine students were recruited from one rural North Carolina high school and trained in the IMPACT curriculum and leadership skills. Four 4th grade classes at a neighboring elementary school were randomized to receive the IMPACT curriculum delivered by the HS students over 12 weeks (two classrooms, 38 students) versus the standard curriculum (two classrooms, 37 students). Pre- and post-intervention surveys were used to assess program effectiveness.

RESULTS

ES students in the intervention classes reported increased fruit and vegetable intake (+0.85 servings/day compared with controls; p < 0.05) and improved knowledge of the food group in which to eat the most servings (p < 0.01). ES students who participated in the IMPACT curriculum also reported increased intake of calcium-rich foods and grains, though these results were not statistically significant. Similar though nonsignificant improvements in diet behaviors were reported by the HS students who assisted in delivering the 4th grade curriculum.

LIMITATIONS

Study limitations include small sample size, risk of cross-contamination, and short program duration.

CONCLUSIONS

ES students who participated in the IMPACT curriculum reported improved dietary behaviors and knowledge. School-based curricula such as IMPACT may help improve nutrition among ES students.

Authors+Show Affiliations

natalie_muth@med.unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19256179

Citation

Muth, Natalie Digate, et al. "Making an IMPACT: Effect of a School-based Pilot Intervention." North Carolina Medical Journal, vol. 69, no. 6, 2008, pp. 432-40.
Muth ND, Chatterjee A, Williams D, et al. Making an IMPACT: effect of a school-based pilot intervention. N C Med J. 2008;69(6):432-40.
Muth, N. D., Chatterjee, A., Williams, D., Cross, A., & Flower, K. (2008). Making an IMPACT: effect of a school-based pilot intervention. North Carolina Medical Journal, 69(6), 432-40.
Muth ND, et al. Making an IMPACT: Effect of a School-based Pilot Intervention. N C Med J. 2008 Nov-Dec;69(6):432-40. PubMed PMID: 19256179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Making an IMPACT: effect of a school-based pilot intervention. AU - Muth,Natalie Digate, AU - Chatterjee,Avik, AU - Williams,Donna, AU - Cross,Alan, AU - Flower,Kori, PY - 2009/3/5/entrez PY - 2009/3/5/pubmed PY - 2009/4/2/medline SP - 432 EP - 40 JF - North Carolina medical journal JO - N C Med J VL - 69 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Poor nutrition and inactivity are widespread and contribute to the epidemic problem of childhood obesity. This study examined the effectiveness of a school-based pilot program to improve nutrition and activity in elementary (ES) and high school (HS) students. METHODS: The Improving Meals and Physical Activity in Children and Teens (IMPACT) school-based curriculum used a train-the-trainer model to improve activity and nutrition. Nine students were recruited from one rural North Carolina high school and trained in the IMPACT curriculum and leadership skills. Four 4th grade classes at a neighboring elementary school were randomized to receive the IMPACT curriculum delivered by the HS students over 12 weeks (two classrooms, 38 students) versus the standard curriculum (two classrooms, 37 students). Pre- and post-intervention surveys were used to assess program effectiveness. RESULTS: ES students in the intervention classes reported increased fruit and vegetable intake (+0.85 servings/day compared with controls; p < 0.05) and improved knowledge of the food group in which to eat the most servings (p < 0.01). ES students who participated in the IMPACT curriculum also reported increased intake of calcium-rich foods and grains, though these results were not statistically significant. Similar though nonsignificant improvements in diet behaviors were reported by the HS students who assisted in delivering the 4th grade curriculum. LIMITATIONS: Study limitations include small sample size, risk of cross-contamination, and short program duration. CONCLUSIONS: ES students who participated in the IMPACT curriculum reported improved dietary behaviors and knowledge. School-based curricula such as IMPACT may help improve nutrition among ES students. SN - 0029-2559 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19256179/Making_an_IMPACT:_effect_of_a_school_based_pilot_intervention_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/schoolhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -