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Role of cranberry on bacterial adhesion forces and implications for Escherichia coli-uroepithelial cell attachment.
J Med Food 2009; 12(2):259-70JM

Abstract

Previous clinical research has suggested that the consumption of cranberry products prevents the adhesion of Escherichia coli to uroepithelial cells by causing changes in bacterial fimbriae. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the adhesion forces between E. coli (nonfimbriated strain HB101 and the P-fimbriated variant HB101pDC1) and a model surface (silicon nitride), to determine the effect of growth in cranberry products on bacterial adhesion. Bacteria were grown in tryptic soy broth supplemented with either light cranberry juice cocktail (L-CJC) or cranberry proanthocyanidins (PACs). Growth of E. coli HB101pDC1 and HB101 in L-CJC or PACs resulted in a decrease in adhesion forces with increasing number of cultures. In a macroscale bacteria-uroepithelial cell adhesion assay a decrease in bacterial attachment was observed for E. coli HB101pDC1 grown in L-CJC or PACs. This effect was reversible because bacteria that were regrown in cranberry-free medium regained their ability to attach to uroepithelial cells, and their adhesion forces reverted to the values observed in the control condition. Exposure to increasing concentrations of L-CJC resulted in a decrease of bacterial attachment to uroepithelial cells for the P-fimbriated strain after L-CJC treatment (27% by weight) and after PACs treatment (345.8 microg/mL). Cranberry products affect the surface properties, such as fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides, and adhesion of fimbriated and nonfimbriated E. coli. The concentration of cranberry products and the number of cultures the bacteria were exposed to cranberry determines how much the adhesion forces and attachment are altered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19257836

Citation

Pinzón-Arango, Paola A., et al. "Role of Cranberry On Bacterial Adhesion Forces and Implications for Escherichia Coli-uroepithelial Cell Attachment." Journal of Medicinal Food, vol. 12, no. 2, 2009, pp. 259-70.
Pinzón-Arango PA, Liu Y, Camesano TA. Role of cranberry on bacterial adhesion forces and implications for Escherichia coli-uroepithelial cell attachment. J Med Food. 2009;12(2):259-70.
Pinzón-Arango, P. A., Liu, Y., & Camesano, T. A. (2009). Role of cranberry on bacterial adhesion forces and implications for Escherichia coli-uroepithelial cell attachment. Journal of Medicinal Food, 12(2), pp. 259-70. doi:10.1089/jmf.2008.0196.
Pinzón-Arango PA, Liu Y, Camesano TA. Role of Cranberry On Bacterial Adhesion Forces and Implications for Escherichia Coli-uroepithelial Cell Attachment. J Med Food. 2009;12(2):259-70. PubMed PMID: 19257836.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of cranberry on bacterial adhesion forces and implications for Escherichia coli-uroepithelial cell attachment. AU - Pinzón-Arango,Paola A, AU - Liu,Yatao, AU - Camesano,Terri A, PY - 2009/3/5/entrez PY - 2009/3/5/pubmed PY - 2009/9/11/medline SP - 259 EP - 70 JF - Journal of medicinal food JO - J Med Food VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - Previous clinical research has suggested that the consumption of cranberry products prevents the adhesion of Escherichia coli to uroepithelial cells by causing changes in bacterial fimbriae. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the adhesion forces between E. coli (nonfimbriated strain HB101 and the P-fimbriated variant HB101pDC1) and a model surface (silicon nitride), to determine the effect of growth in cranberry products on bacterial adhesion. Bacteria were grown in tryptic soy broth supplemented with either light cranberry juice cocktail (L-CJC) or cranberry proanthocyanidins (PACs). Growth of E. coli HB101pDC1 and HB101 in L-CJC or PACs resulted in a decrease in adhesion forces with increasing number of cultures. In a macroscale bacteria-uroepithelial cell adhesion assay a decrease in bacterial attachment was observed for E. coli HB101pDC1 grown in L-CJC or PACs. This effect was reversible because bacteria that were regrown in cranberry-free medium regained their ability to attach to uroepithelial cells, and their adhesion forces reverted to the values observed in the control condition. Exposure to increasing concentrations of L-CJC resulted in a decrease of bacterial attachment to uroepithelial cells for the P-fimbriated strain after L-CJC treatment (27% by weight) and after PACs treatment (345.8 microg/mL). Cranberry products affect the surface properties, such as fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides, and adhesion of fimbriated and nonfimbriated E. coli. The concentration of cranberry products and the number of cultures the bacteria were exposed to cranberry determines how much the adhesion forces and attachment are altered. SN - 1557-7600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19257836/Role_of_cranberry_on_bacterial_adhesion_forces_and_implications_for_Escherichia_coli_uroepithelial_cell_attachment_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jmf.2008.0196?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -