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Increased risk of oncogenic human papillomavirus infections and incident high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among smokers: experience from the Latin American screening study.
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Apr; 36(4):241-8.ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of smoking on the prevalence and incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in a large sample of Latin American women.

METHODS

The study examines baseline data on over 12,000 women included in the Latin American Screening Study (Brazil and Argentina), and over 1000 women followed-up for a period of 36 months. Three groups were formed: never smokers, current, and past smokers. The prevalence of hr-HPV infection and CIN were compared between the study groups. In the prospective analysis, women were controlled at 6-month intervals to assess the cumulative risk of incident hr-HPV infection, smear abnormalities, and CIN.

RESULTS

A higher prevalence (21.7%) of hr-HPV infection was found among current smokers as compared to never smokers (16.5%) or past smokers (13.5%). Being current smoker was significantly (P <0.01) associated with hr-HPV detection (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2-2.1). Being a current smoker was a significant predictor of incident hr-HPV during the follow-up [Hazards ratio (HR) = 1.4; 95% CI 1.0-1.9]. For incident CIN2+, being a past smoker (HR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.6-9.8) or current smoker (HR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.5-8.6) were the significant independent predictors. Current and past smokers had a significantly increased risk of incident CIN2+ (P <0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Smoking increases the risk of contracting hr-HPV infection and modifies the effect of a persistent hr-HPV infection by further increasing the risk of developing CIN2+. It seems that this effect modification persists over several years after smoking cessation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19265732

Citation

Sarian, Luis Otavio, et al. "Increased Risk of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Infections and Incident High-grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Among Smokers: Experience From the Latin American Screening Study." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 36, no. 4, 2009, pp. 241-8.
Sarian LO, Hammes LS, Longatto-Filho A, et al. Increased risk of oncogenic human papillomavirus infections and incident high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among smokers: experience from the Latin American screening study. Sex Transm Dis. 2009;36(4):241-8.
Sarian, L. O., Hammes, L. S., Longatto-Filho, A., Guarisi, R., Derchain, S. F., Roteli-Martins, C., Naud, P., Erzen, M., Branca, M., Tatti, S., de Matos, J. C., Gontijo, R., Maeda, M. Y., Lima, T., Costa, S., Syrjänen, S., & Syrjänen, K. (2009). Increased risk of oncogenic human papillomavirus infections and incident high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among smokers: experience from the Latin American screening study. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36(4), 241-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181935a7d
Sarian LO, et al. Increased Risk of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Infections and Incident High-grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Among Smokers: Experience From the Latin American Screening Study. Sex Transm Dis. 2009;36(4):241-8. PubMed PMID: 19265732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased risk of oncogenic human papillomavirus infections and incident high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among smokers: experience from the Latin American screening study. AU - Sarian,Luis Otavio, AU - Hammes,Luciano Serpa, AU - Longatto-Filho,Adhemar, AU - Guarisi,Renata, AU - Derchain,Sophie F M, AU - Roteli-Martins,Cecília, AU - Naud,Paulo, AU - Erzen,Mojca, AU - Branca,Margherita, AU - Tatti,Sílvio, AU - de Matos,Jean Carlos, AU - Gontijo,Renata, AU - Maeda,Marina Y S, AU - Lima,Temístocles, AU - Costa,Silvano, AU - Syrjänen,Stina, AU - Syrjänen,Kari, PY - 2009/3/7/entrez PY - 2009/3/7/pubmed PY - 2009/5/12/medline SP - 241 EP - 8 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 36 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of smoking on the prevalence and incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in a large sample of Latin American women. METHODS: The study examines baseline data on over 12,000 women included in the Latin American Screening Study (Brazil and Argentina), and over 1000 women followed-up for a period of 36 months. Three groups were formed: never smokers, current, and past smokers. The prevalence of hr-HPV infection and CIN were compared between the study groups. In the prospective analysis, women were controlled at 6-month intervals to assess the cumulative risk of incident hr-HPV infection, smear abnormalities, and CIN. RESULTS: A higher prevalence (21.7%) of hr-HPV infection was found among current smokers as compared to never smokers (16.5%) or past smokers (13.5%). Being current smoker was significantly (P <0.01) associated with hr-HPV detection (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2-2.1). Being a current smoker was a significant predictor of incident hr-HPV during the follow-up [Hazards ratio (HR) = 1.4; 95% CI 1.0-1.9]. For incident CIN2+, being a past smoker (HR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.6-9.8) or current smoker (HR = 3.6; 95% CI 1.5-8.6) were the significant independent predictors. Current and past smokers had a significantly increased risk of incident CIN2+ (P <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking increases the risk of contracting hr-HPV infection and modifies the effect of a persistent hr-HPV infection by further increasing the risk of developing CIN2+. It seems that this effect modification persists over several years after smoking cessation. SN - 1537-4521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19265732/Increased_risk_of_oncogenic_human_papillomavirus_infections_and_incident_high_grade_cervical_intraepithelial_neoplasia_among_smokers:_experience_from_the_Latin_American_screening_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181935a7d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -