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'Bad guys' among the antiparkinsonian drugs.
Psychiatr Danub. 2009 Mar; 21(1):114-8.PD

Abstract

The first effective drugs for Parkinson's disease (PD) were anticholinergics, introduced at the end of 19.th century by Charcot. Since the introduction of levodopa in the sixties of the previous century, many new drugs have emerged for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: dopamine agonists (ergot as well as non-ergot, bromocriptine, pergolide, mirapexine, ropinirole), MAO B inhibitors (selegiline, rasagiline), amantadine, COMT inhibitors (entacapone, tolcapone). In all stages of the disease, levodopa remains the most effective drug for improving motor symptoms in PD. However, long term treatment with levodopa is accompanied by the development of motor fluctuations, dyskinesia, cognitive and neuropsychiatric adverse effects and increasingly diverse spectrum of drugs is needed to alleviate motor and nonmotor symptoms. Some of these drugs have caused considerable concern and controversies and were regarded at certain points as the 'bad guys' of Parkinson's disease pharmacological armamentarium. In the article, a short review of 'bad guys' including anticholinergics, selegiline, tolcapone and dopamine agonists, is given.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Extrapyramidal Disorders, Department of Neurology, UMCL, Zaloska 2, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Zvezdan.pirtosek@kclj.si

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19270634

Citation

Pirtosek, Zvezdan. "'Bad Guys' Among the Antiparkinsonian Drugs." Psychiatria Danubina, vol. 21, no. 1, 2009, pp. 114-8.
Pirtosek Z. 'Bad guys' among the antiparkinsonian drugs. Psychiatr Danub. 2009;21(1):114-8.
Pirtosek, Z. (2009). 'Bad guys' among the antiparkinsonian drugs. Psychiatria Danubina, 21(1), 114-8.
Pirtosek Z. 'Bad Guys' Among the Antiparkinsonian Drugs. Psychiatr Danub. 2009;21(1):114-8. PubMed PMID: 19270634.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 'Bad guys' among the antiparkinsonian drugs. A1 - Pirtosek,Zvezdan, PY - 2009/3/10/entrez PY - 2009/3/10/pubmed PY - 2009/5/19/medline SP - 114 EP - 8 JF - Psychiatria Danubina JO - Psychiatr Danub VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - The first effective drugs for Parkinson's disease (PD) were anticholinergics, introduced at the end of 19.th century by Charcot. Since the introduction of levodopa in the sixties of the previous century, many new drugs have emerged for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: dopamine agonists (ergot as well as non-ergot, bromocriptine, pergolide, mirapexine, ropinirole), MAO B inhibitors (selegiline, rasagiline), amantadine, COMT inhibitors (entacapone, tolcapone). In all stages of the disease, levodopa remains the most effective drug for improving motor symptoms in PD. However, long term treatment with levodopa is accompanied by the development of motor fluctuations, dyskinesia, cognitive and neuropsychiatric adverse effects and increasingly diverse spectrum of drugs is needed to alleviate motor and nonmotor symptoms. Some of these drugs have caused considerable concern and controversies and were regarded at certain points as the 'bad guys' of Parkinson's disease pharmacological armamentarium. In the article, a short review of 'bad guys' including anticholinergics, selegiline, tolcapone and dopamine agonists, is given. SN - 0353-5053 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19270634/'Bad_guys'_among_the_antiparkinsonian_drugs_ L2 - http://www.psychiatria-danubina.com/UserDocsImages/pdf/dnb_vol21_no1/dnb_vol21_no1_114.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -