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Help-seeking behavior for intimate partner violence among racial minority women in Canada.
Womens Health Issues. 2009 Mar-Apr; 19(2):101-8.WH

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is experienced by women of all ethnoracial backgrounds. Despite the serious adverse impacts of IPV on women's lives, many abused women do not seek help. The main objective of this paper was to determine whether a woman's racial minority status was a significant predictor of help-seeking for IPV after controlling for other factors associated with help-seeking.

METHODS

Data from a national Canadian, cross-sectional, telephone survey were used. Help-seeking variables included disclosure of IPV, reporting IPV to police, the use of social services subsequent to IPV, and barriers to social service use.

RESULTS

In the bivariate analyses, rates of disclosure and reporting to police were similar for racial minority and white women, however, racial minority women, compared to white women, were significantly less likely to use social services. After adjustment for age, marital status, household income, number of young children at home, immigration status, household language, and severity of IPV, racial minority status was not a significant predictor of help-seeking in the multivariate analysis.

DISCUSSION

Our findings suggest that further investigation is necessary to understand what aspects of membership in a racial minority group or sytemic factors may be contributing to inequalities in accessing help for IPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. i.hyman@utoronto.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19272560

Citation

Hyman, Ilene, et al. "Help-seeking Behavior for Intimate Partner Violence Among Racial Minority Women in Canada." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 19, no. 2, 2009, pp. 101-8.
Hyman I, Forte T, Du Mont J, et al. Help-seeking behavior for intimate partner violence among racial minority women in Canada. Womens Health Issues. 2009;19(2):101-8.
Hyman, I., Forte, T., Du Mont, J., Romans, S., & Cohen, M. M. (2009). Help-seeking behavior for intimate partner violence among racial minority women in Canada. Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 19(2), 101-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2008.10.002
Hyman I, et al. Help-seeking Behavior for Intimate Partner Violence Among Racial Minority Women in Canada. Womens Health Issues. 2009 Mar-Apr;19(2):101-8. PubMed PMID: 19272560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Help-seeking behavior for intimate partner violence among racial minority women in Canada. AU - Hyman,Ilene, AU - Forte,Tonia, AU - Du Mont,Janice, AU - Romans,Sarah, AU - Cohen,Marsha M, PY - 2007/09/19/received PY - 2008/09/28/revised PY - 2008/10/24/accepted PY - 2009/3/11/entrez PY - 2009/3/11/pubmed PY - 2009/6/6/medline SP - 101 EP - 8 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is experienced by women of all ethnoracial backgrounds. Despite the serious adverse impacts of IPV on women's lives, many abused women do not seek help. The main objective of this paper was to determine whether a woman's racial minority status was a significant predictor of help-seeking for IPV after controlling for other factors associated with help-seeking. METHODS: Data from a national Canadian, cross-sectional, telephone survey were used. Help-seeking variables included disclosure of IPV, reporting IPV to police, the use of social services subsequent to IPV, and barriers to social service use. RESULTS: In the bivariate analyses, rates of disclosure and reporting to police were similar for racial minority and white women, however, racial minority women, compared to white women, were significantly less likely to use social services. After adjustment for age, marital status, household income, number of young children at home, immigration status, household language, and severity of IPV, racial minority status was not a significant predictor of help-seeking in the multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest that further investigation is necessary to understand what aspects of membership in a racial minority group or sytemic factors may be contributing to inequalities in accessing help for IPV. SN - 1049-3867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19272560/Help_seeking_behavior_for_intimate_partner_violence_among_racial_minority_women_in_Canada_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(08)00156-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -