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Vitamin C intake and the risk of gout in men: a prospective study.
Arch Intern Med 2009; 169(5):502-7AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several metabolic studies and a recent double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial have shown that higher vitamin C intake significantly reduces serum uric acid levels. Yet the relation with risk of gout is unknown.

METHODS

We prospectively examined, from 1986 through 2006, the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of incident gout in 46 994 male participants with no history of gout at baseline. We used a supplementary questionnaire to ascertain the American College of Rheumatology criteria for gout. Vitamin C intake was assessed every 4 years through validated questionnaires.

RESULTS

During the 20 years of follow-up, we documented 1317 confirmed incident cases of gout. Compared with men with vitamin C intake less than 250 mg/d, the multivariate relative risk (RR) of gout was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.97) for total vitamin C intake of 500 to 999 mg/d, 0.66 (0.52-0.86) for 1000 to 1499 mg/d, and 0.55 (0.38-0.80) for 1500 mg/d or greater (P < .001 for trend). The multivariate RR per 500-mg increase in total daily vitamin C intake was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.77-0.90). Compared with men who did not use supplemental vitamin C, the multivariate RR of gout was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49-0.88) for supplemental vitamin C intake of 1000 to 1499 mg/d and 0.55 (0.36-0.86) for 1500 mg/d or greater (P < .001 for trend).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher vitamin C intake is independently associated with a lower risk of gout. Supplemental vitamin C intake may be beneficial in the prevention of gout.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. hchoius@bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19273781

Citation

Choi, Hyon K., et al. "Vitamin C Intake and the Risk of Gout in Men: a Prospective Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 169, no. 5, 2009, pp. 502-7.
Choi HK, Gao X, Curhan G. Vitamin C intake and the risk of gout in men: a prospective study. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(5):502-7.
Choi, H. K., Gao, X., & Curhan, G. (2009). Vitamin C intake and the risk of gout in men: a prospective study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 169(5), pp. 502-7. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2008.606.
Choi HK, Gao X, Curhan G. Vitamin C Intake and the Risk of Gout in Men: a Prospective Study. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 9;169(5):502-7. PubMed PMID: 19273781.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C intake and the risk of gout in men: a prospective study. AU - Choi,Hyon K, AU - Gao,Xiang, AU - Curhan,Gary, PY - 2009/3/11/entrez PY - 2009/3/11/pubmed PY - 2009/4/25/medline SP - 502 EP - 7 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 169 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several metabolic studies and a recent double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial have shown that higher vitamin C intake significantly reduces serum uric acid levels. Yet the relation with risk of gout is unknown. METHODS: We prospectively examined, from 1986 through 2006, the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of incident gout in 46 994 male participants with no history of gout at baseline. We used a supplementary questionnaire to ascertain the American College of Rheumatology criteria for gout. Vitamin C intake was assessed every 4 years through validated questionnaires. RESULTS: During the 20 years of follow-up, we documented 1317 confirmed incident cases of gout. Compared with men with vitamin C intake less than 250 mg/d, the multivariate relative risk (RR) of gout was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.97) for total vitamin C intake of 500 to 999 mg/d, 0.66 (0.52-0.86) for 1000 to 1499 mg/d, and 0.55 (0.38-0.80) for 1500 mg/d or greater (P < .001 for trend). The multivariate RR per 500-mg increase in total daily vitamin C intake was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.77-0.90). Compared with men who did not use supplemental vitamin C, the multivariate RR of gout was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49-0.88) for supplemental vitamin C intake of 1000 to 1499 mg/d and 0.55 (0.36-0.86) for 1500 mg/d or greater (P < .001 for trend). CONCLUSIONS: Higher vitamin C intake is independently associated with a lower risk of gout. Supplemental vitamin C intake may be beneficial in the prevention of gout. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19273781/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinternmed.2008.606 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -