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ABO blood group and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Other than several rare, highly penetrant familial syndromes, genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic cancer are largely unknown. ABO blood type is an inherited characteristic that in previous small studies has been associated with the risk of gastrointestinal malignancies.

METHODS

We separately examined the relationship between ABO blood type and the risk of incident pancreatic cancer in two large, independent, prospective cohort studies (the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study) that collected blood group data on 107 503 US health professionals. Hazard ratios for pancreatic cancer by ABO blood type were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other known risk factors, including age, tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, and history of diabetes mellitus. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

During 927 995 person-years of follow-up, 316 participants developed pancreatic cancer. ABO blood type was associated with the risk of developing pancreatic cancer (P = .004; log-rank test). Compared with participants with blood group O, those with blood groups A, AB, or B were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer (adjusted hazard ratios for incident pancreatic cancer were 1.32 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 1.02 to 1.72], 1.51 [95% CI = 1.02 to 2.23], and 1.72 [95% CI = 1.25 to 2.38], respectively). The association between blood type and pancreatic cancer risk was nearly identical in the two cohorts (P(interaction) = .97). Overall, 17% of the pancreatic cancer cases were attributable to inheriting a non-O blood group (blood group A, B, or AB). The age-adjusted incidence rates for pancreatic cancer per 100 000 person-years were 27 (95% CI = 23 to 33) for participants with blood type O, 36 (95% CI = 26 to 50) for those with blood type A, 41 (95% CI = 31 to 56) for those with blood type AB, and 46 (95% CI = 32 to 68) for those with blood type B.

CONCLUSIONS

In two large, independent populations, ABO blood type was statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are necessary to define the mechanisms by which ABO blood type or closely linked genetic variants may influence pancreatic cancer risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 101:6 2009 Mar 18 pg 424-31

    MeSH

    ABO Blood-Group System
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Confidence Intervals
    Disease Susceptibility
    Female
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Odds Ratio
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Research Design
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19276450

    Citation

    Wolpin, Brian M., et al. "ABO Blood Group and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 101, no. 6, 2009, pp. 424-31.
    Wolpin BM, Chan AT, Hartge P, et al. ABO blood group and the risk of pancreatic cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2009;101(6):424-31.
    Wolpin, B. M., Chan, A. T., Hartge, P., Chanock, S. J., Kraft, P., Hunter, D. J., ... Fuchs, C. S. (2009). ABO blood group and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 101(6), pp. 424-31. doi:10.1093/jnci/djp020.
    Wolpin BM, et al. ABO Blood Group and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2009 Mar 18;101(6):424-31. PubMed PMID: 19276450.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - ABO blood group and the risk of pancreatic cancer. AU - Wolpin,Brian M, AU - Chan,Andrew T, AU - Hartge,Patricia, AU - Chanock,Stephen J, AU - Kraft,Peter, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, Y1 - 2009/03/10/ PY - 2009/3/12/entrez PY - 2009/3/12/pubmed PY - 2009/4/30/medline SP - 424 EP - 31 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 101 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Other than several rare, highly penetrant familial syndromes, genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic cancer are largely unknown. ABO blood type is an inherited characteristic that in previous small studies has been associated with the risk of gastrointestinal malignancies. METHODS: We separately examined the relationship between ABO blood type and the risk of incident pancreatic cancer in two large, independent, prospective cohort studies (the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study) that collected blood group data on 107 503 US health professionals. Hazard ratios for pancreatic cancer by ABO blood type were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other known risk factors, including age, tobacco use, body mass index, physical activity, and history of diabetes mellitus. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During 927 995 person-years of follow-up, 316 participants developed pancreatic cancer. ABO blood type was associated with the risk of developing pancreatic cancer (P = .004; log-rank test). Compared with participants with blood group O, those with blood groups A, AB, or B were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer (adjusted hazard ratios for incident pancreatic cancer were 1.32 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 1.02 to 1.72], 1.51 [95% CI = 1.02 to 2.23], and 1.72 [95% CI = 1.25 to 2.38], respectively). The association between blood type and pancreatic cancer risk was nearly identical in the two cohorts (P(interaction) = .97). Overall, 17% of the pancreatic cancer cases were attributable to inheriting a non-O blood group (blood group A, B, or AB). The age-adjusted incidence rates for pancreatic cancer per 100 000 person-years were 27 (95% CI = 23 to 33) for participants with blood type O, 36 (95% CI = 26 to 50) for those with blood type A, 41 (95% CI = 31 to 56) for those with blood type AB, and 46 (95% CI = 32 to 68) for those with blood type B. CONCLUSIONS: In two large, independent populations, ABO blood type was statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are necessary to define the mechanisms by which ABO blood type or closely linked genetic variants may influence pancreatic cancer risk. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19276450/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djp020 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -