Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Applying computer techniques in maxillofacial reconstruction using a fibula flap: a messenger and an evaluation method.
J Craniofac Surg. 2009 Mar; 20(2):372-7.JC

Abstract

While the application of computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery becomes increasingly popular, the translation from virtual models and surgical plans to actual bedside maneuvers and the evaluation of the repeatability of virtual planning remain to be major challenges. The objective of this study was to experiment the technique of using a resin template as a messenger in maxillofacial reconstruction involving a fibula flap. Another aim was to find a quantitative and objective method to evaluate the repeatability of preoperative planning. Seven patients who underwent maxillary or mandibular reconstruction were included in this study. The mean age was 25 years, and the mean follow-up period was 18.7 months. Virtual planning was carried out before surgery. A resin template was made according to the virtual design of bone graft through rapid prototyping technique and served as a guide when surgeons shaped the fibula flap during surgery. The repeatability of the virtual plan was evaluated based on the matching percentage between the actual postoperative model and the computer-generated outcome. All patients demonstrated satisfactory clinical outcomes. The mean repeatability was 87.5% within 1 mm and 96.5% within 2 mm in isolated bone graft. It was 71.4% within 1 mm and 89.9% within 2 mm in reconstructed mandible or maxilla. These results demonstrated that a resin template based on virtual plan and rapid prototyping technique is a reliable messenger to translate from computer modeling to bedside surgical procedures. The repeatability of a virtual plan can be easily and quantitatively evaluated through our three-dimensional differential analysis method.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Peking University Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19276828

Citation

Liu, Xiao-jing, et al. "Applying Computer Techniques in Maxillofacial Reconstruction Using a Fibula Flap: a Messenger and an Evaluation Method." The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 20, no. 2, 2009, pp. 372-7.
Liu XJ, Gui L, Mao C, et al. Applying computer techniques in maxillofacial reconstruction using a fibula flap: a messenger and an evaluation method. J Craniofac Surg. 2009;20(2):372-7.
Liu, X. J., Gui, L., Mao, C., Peng, X., & Yu, G. Y. (2009). Applying computer techniques in maxillofacial reconstruction using a fibula flap: a messenger and an evaluation method. The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 20(2), 372-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31819b9443
Liu XJ, et al. Applying Computer Techniques in Maxillofacial Reconstruction Using a Fibula Flap: a Messenger and an Evaluation Method. J Craniofac Surg. 2009;20(2):372-7. PubMed PMID: 19276828.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Applying computer techniques in maxillofacial reconstruction using a fibula flap: a messenger and an evaluation method. AU - Liu,Xiao-jing, AU - Gui,Lai, AU - Mao,Chi, AU - Peng,Xin, AU - Yu,Guang-yan, PY - 2009/3/12/entrez PY - 2009/3/12/pubmed PY - 2009/8/13/medline SP - 372 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of craniofacial surgery JO - J Craniofac Surg VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - While the application of computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery becomes increasingly popular, the translation from virtual models and surgical plans to actual bedside maneuvers and the evaluation of the repeatability of virtual planning remain to be major challenges. The objective of this study was to experiment the technique of using a resin template as a messenger in maxillofacial reconstruction involving a fibula flap. Another aim was to find a quantitative and objective method to evaluate the repeatability of preoperative planning. Seven patients who underwent maxillary or mandibular reconstruction were included in this study. The mean age was 25 years, and the mean follow-up period was 18.7 months. Virtual planning was carried out before surgery. A resin template was made according to the virtual design of bone graft through rapid prototyping technique and served as a guide when surgeons shaped the fibula flap during surgery. The repeatability of the virtual plan was evaluated based on the matching percentage between the actual postoperative model and the computer-generated outcome. All patients demonstrated satisfactory clinical outcomes. The mean repeatability was 87.5% within 1 mm and 96.5% within 2 mm in isolated bone graft. It was 71.4% within 1 mm and 89.9% within 2 mm in reconstructed mandible or maxilla. These results demonstrated that a resin template based on virtual plan and rapid prototyping technique is a reliable messenger to translate from computer modeling to bedside surgical procedures. The repeatability of a virtual plan can be easily and quantitatively evaluated through our three-dimensional differential analysis method. SN - 1536-3732 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19276828/Applying_computer_techniques_in_maxillofacial_reconstruction_using_a_fibula_flap:_a_messenger_and_an_evaluation_method_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31819b9443 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -