Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Health effects of vegan diets.
Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89(5):1627S-1633SAJ

Abstract

Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease. However, eliminating all animal products from the diet increases the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients of special concern for the vegan include vitamins B-12 and D, calcium, and long-chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids. Unless vegans regularly consume foods that are fortified with these nutrients, appropriate supplements should be consumed. In some cases, iron and zinc status of vegans may also be of concern because of the limited bioavailability of these minerals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI, USA. wcraig@andrews.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19279075

Citation

Craig, Winston J.. "Health Effects of Vegan Diets." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 5, 2009, 1627S-1633S.
Craig WJ. Health effects of vegan diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(5):1627S-1633S.
Craig, W. J. (2009). Health effects of vegan diets. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(5), 1627S-1633S. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.26736N.
Craig WJ. Health Effects of Vegan Diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(5):1627S-1633S. PubMed PMID: 19279075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health effects of vegan diets. A1 - Craig,Winston J, Y1 - 2009/03/11/ PY - 2009/3/13/entrez PY - 2009/3/13/pubmed PY - 2009/5/15/medline SP - 1627S EP - 1633S JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 89 IS - 5 N2 - Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease. However, eliminating all animal products from the diet increases the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients of special concern for the vegan include vitamins B-12 and D, calcium, and long-chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids. Unless vegans regularly consume foods that are fortified with these nutrients, appropriate supplements should be consumed. In some cases, iron and zinc status of vegans may also be of concern because of the limited bioavailability of these minerals. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19279075/Health_effects_of_vegan_diets_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.26736N DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -