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Seafaring stressors aboard merchant and passenger ships.
Int J Public Health. 2009; 54(2):96-105.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to identify stressors in seafaring aboard merchant and passenger vessels. Furthermore, their dependence on occupational and non-occupational factors was assessed.

METHODS

A total of 134 male seafarers sailing under German-flagged vessels were interviewed (response 81.3 %). The seamen rated the individual stress level of 23 different stressors aboard.

RESULTS

Separation from their family (named 48 times), time pressure (30 times), long working days (28 times), heat in workplaces (24 times), and insufficient qualification of subordinate crew members (16 times) were regarded as the most important stressors aboard. In comparison to non-officers, officers stayed on board for considerably shorter periods (4.8 vs. 8.3 months) but had significantly more often an extremely high number of working hours (63.5 % vs. 21.1 %, Chi-square-test: p < 0.001). Correspondingly, officers complained more frequently of a higher stress level due to time pressure (52.4 % vs. 36.6 %).

CONCLUSIONS

Particular attention should be paid to preventive organizational measures such as avoiding long-time separation from family, time-pressure, extremely long working days, and a long stay on board.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maritime Medicine, Institute for Occupational and Maritime Medicine (ZfAM), University of Hamburg, Seewartenstrasse 10, D-20459, Hamburg, Germany. marcus.oldenburg@bsg.hamburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19288290

Citation

Oldenburg, Marcus, et al. "Seafaring Stressors Aboard Merchant and Passenger Ships." International Journal of Public Health, vol. 54, no. 2, 2009, pp. 96-105.
Oldenburg M, Jensen HJ, Latza U, et al. Seafaring stressors aboard merchant and passenger ships. Int J Public Health. 2009;54(2):96-105.
Oldenburg, M., Jensen, H. J., Latza, U., & Baur, X. (2009). Seafaring stressors aboard merchant and passenger ships. International Journal of Public Health, 54(2), 96-105. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-009-7067-z
Oldenburg M, et al. Seafaring Stressors Aboard Merchant and Passenger Ships. Int J Public Health. 2009;54(2):96-105. PubMed PMID: 19288290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seafaring stressors aboard merchant and passenger ships. AU - Oldenburg,Marcus, AU - Jensen,Hans-Joachim, AU - Latza,Ute, AU - Baur,Xaver, PY - 2009/3/17/entrez PY - 2009/3/17/pubmed PY - 2009/7/8/medline SP - 96 EP - 105 JF - International journal of public health JO - Int J Public Health VL - 54 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify stressors in seafaring aboard merchant and passenger vessels. Furthermore, their dependence on occupational and non-occupational factors was assessed. METHODS: A total of 134 male seafarers sailing under German-flagged vessels were interviewed (response 81.3 %). The seamen rated the individual stress level of 23 different stressors aboard. RESULTS: Separation from their family (named 48 times), time pressure (30 times), long working days (28 times), heat in workplaces (24 times), and insufficient qualification of subordinate crew members (16 times) were regarded as the most important stressors aboard. In comparison to non-officers, officers stayed on board for considerably shorter periods (4.8 vs. 8.3 months) but had significantly more often an extremely high number of working hours (63.5 % vs. 21.1 %, Chi-square-test: p < 0.001). Correspondingly, officers complained more frequently of a higher stress level due to time pressure (52.4 % vs. 36.6 %). CONCLUSIONS: Particular attention should be paid to preventive organizational measures such as avoiding long-time separation from family, time-pressure, extremely long working days, and a long stay on board. SN - 1661-8564 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19288290/Seafaring_stressors_aboard_merchant_and_passenger_ships_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00038-009-7067-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -