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Virtual human dissector as a learning tool for studying cross-sectional anatomy.
Med Teach. 2009 Jun; 31(6):553-5.MT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Within diagnostic medicine there is a continuing and marked increase in the use of two-dimensional (2D) images of cross-sectional anatomy. Medical undergraduates should therefore develop skills to interpret such images early in their education. The Virtual Human Dissector (VHD) software facilitates such learning, permitting users to study actual images of 2D anatomical cross-sections and reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) views simultaneously. This study investigates the use of VHD in facilitating students' ability to interpret cross-sectional images and understand the relationships between anatomical structures.

METHODS

First year medical students (n=89) were randomly divided into two groups. Using a crossover design, the investigation was undertaken as two 20 minute self-directed learning (SDL) activities using VHD in a computer suite and prosections and models in the dissecting room (DR), interspersed between 3 tests identifying anatomical structures in cross-sectional images (pre-, mid- and post-session).

RESULTS

Statistical analysis of test performance revealed significant improvements in each group between the pre- and midsession tests, and again between mid- and post-session tests. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage. SDL using the VHD was as effective as SDL using prosections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine and Health, University of Durham, Holliday Building, Queen's Campus, University Boulevard, Thornaby, Stockton-on-Tees, UK. leo.donnelly@durham.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19288305

Citation

Donnelly, Leo, et al. "Virtual Human Dissector as a Learning Tool for Studying Cross-sectional Anatomy." Medical Teacher, vol. 31, no. 6, 2009, pp. 553-5.
Donnelly L, Patten D, White P, et al. Virtual human dissector as a learning tool for studying cross-sectional anatomy. Med Teach. 2009;31(6):553-5.
Donnelly, L., Patten, D., White, P., & Finn, G. (2009). Virtual human dissector as a learning tool for studying cross-sectional anatomy. Medical Teacher, 31(6), 553-5. https://doi.org/10.1080/01421590802512953
Donnelly L, et al. Virtual Human Dissector as a Learning Tool for Studying Cross-sectional Anatomy. Med Teach. 2009;31(6):553-5. PubMed PMID: 19288305.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virtual human dissector as a learning tool for studying cross-sectional anatomy. AU - Donnelly,Leo, AU - Patten,Debra, AU - White,Pamela, AU - Finn,Gabrielle, PY - 2009/3/17/entrez PY - 2009/3/17/pubmed PY - 2010/10/12/medline SP - 553 EP - 5 JF - Medical teacher JO - Med Teach VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Within diagnostic medicine there is a continuing and marked increase in the use of two-dimensional (2D) images of cross-sectional anatomy. Medical undergraduates should therefore develop skills to interpret such images early in their education. The Virtual Human Dissector (VHD) software facilitates such learning, permitting users to study actual images of 2D anatomical cross-sections and reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) views simultaneously. This study investigates the use of VHD in facilitating students' ability to interpret cross-sectional images and understand the relationships between anatomical structures. METHODS: First year medical students (n=89) were randomly divided into two groups. Using a crossover design, the investigation was undertaken as two 20 minute self-directed learning (SDL) activities using VHD in a computer suite and prosections and models in the dissecting room (DR), interspersed between 3 tests identifying anatomical structures in cross-sectional images (pre-, mid- and post-session). RESULTS: Statistical analysis of test performance revealed significant improvements in each group between the pre- and midsession tests, and again between mid- and post-session tests. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any stage. SDL using the VHD was as effective as SDL using prosections. SN - 1466-187X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19288305/Virtual_human_dissector_as_a_learning_tool_for_studying_cross_sectional_anatomy_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -