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Neighborhood retail food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population.
Am J Health Promot. 2009 Mar-Apr; 23(4):255-64.AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine relationships between the neighborhood food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population.

DESIGN

Analysis of cross-sectional survey and observational data.

SETTING

One hundred forty-six neighborhoods within three large geographic communities of Detroit, Michigan.

SUBJECTS

Probability sample of 919 African-American, Latino, and white adults.

MEASURES

The dependent variable was mean daily fruit and vegetable servings, as measured by using a modified Block 98 food frequency questionnaire. Independent variables included the neighborhood food environment: store availability (i.e., large grocery, specialty, convenience, liquor, small grocery), supermarket proximity (i.e., street-network distance to nearest chain grocer), and perceived and observed neighborhood fresh fruit and vegetable supply (i.e., availability, variety, quality, affordability).

ANALYSIS

Weighted, multilevel regression.

RESULTS

Presence of a large grocery store in the neighborhood was associated with, on average, 0.69 more daily fruit and vegetable servings in the full sample. Relationships between the food environment and fruit and vegetable intake did not differ between whites and African-Americans. However, Latinos, compared with African-Americans, who had a large grocery store in the neighborhood consumed 2.20 more daily servings of fruits and vegetables. Presence of a convenience store in the neighborhood was associated with 1.84 fewer daily fruit and vegetable servings among Latinos than among African-Americans.

CONCLUSION

The neighborhood food environment influences fruit and vegetable intake, and the size of this relationship may vary for different racial/ethnic subpopulations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Mental Health, and Administrative Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. szenk@uic.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19288847

Citation

Zenk, Shannon N., et al. "Neighborhood Retail Food Environment and Fruit and Vegetable Intake in a Multiethnic Urban Population." American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, vol. 23, no. 4, 2009, pp. 255-64.
Zenk SN, Lachance LL, Schulz AJ, et al. Neighborhood retail food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population. Am J Health Promot. 2009;23(4):255-64.
Zenk, S. N., Lachance, L. L., Schulz, A. J., Mentz, G., Kannan, S., & Ridella, W. (2009). Neighborhood retail food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population. American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, 23(4), 255-64. https://doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.071204127
Zenk SN, et al. Neighborhood Retail Food Environment and Fruit and Vegetable Intake in a Multiethnic Urban Population. Am J Health Promot. 2009 Mar-Apr;23(4):255-64. PubMed PMID: 19288847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neighborhood retail food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population. AU - Zenk,Shannon N, AU - Lachance,Laurie L, AU - Schulz,Amy J, AU - Mentz,Graciela, AU - Kannan,Srimathi, AU - Ridella,William, PY - 2009/3/18/entrez PY - 2009/3/18/pubmed PY - 2009/4/8/medline SP - 255 EP - 64 JF - American journal of health promotion : AJHP JO - Am J Health Promot VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine relationships between the neighborhood food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in a multiethnic urban population. DESIGN: Analysis of cross-sectional survey and observational data. SETTING: One hundred forty-six neighborhoods within three large geographic communities of Detroit, Michigan. SUBJECTS: Probability sample of 919 African-American, Latino, and white adults. MEASURES: The dependent variable was mean daily fruit and vegetable servings, as measured by using a modified Block 98 food frequency questionnaire. Independent variables included the neighborhood food environment: store availability (i.e., large grocery, specialty, convenience, liquor, small grocery), supermarket proximity (i.e., street-network distance to nearest chain grocer), and perceived and observed neighborhood fresh fruit and vegetable supply (i.e., availability, variety, quality, affordability). ANALYSIS: Weighted, multilevel regression. RESULTS: Presence of a large grocery store in the neighborhood was associated with, on average, 0.69 more daily fruit and vegetable servings in the full sample. Relationships between the food environment and fruit and vegetable intake did not differ between whites and African-Americans. However, Latinos, compared with African-Americans, who had a large grocery store in the neighborhood consumed 2.20 more daily servings of fruits and vegetables. Presence of a convenience store in the neighborhood was associated with 1.84 fewer daily fruit and vegetable servings among Latinos than among African-Americans. CONCLUSION: The neighborhood food environment influences fruit and vegetable intake, and the size of this relationship may vary for different racial/ethnic subpopulations. SN - 0890-1171 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19288847/Neighborhood_retail_food_environment_and_fruit_and_vegetable_intake_in_a_multiethnic_urban_population_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.4278/ajhp.071204127?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -