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Trends and subgroup differences in transportation-related injury risk and safety behaviors among US high school students, 1991-2007.
J Sch Health 2009; 79(4):169-76JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Seventy percent of unintentional injury-related fatalities--the leading cause of death among youth in the United States--are motor vehicle traffic related. Examining traffic-related safety, therefore, is crucial to public health. This study examines trends in traffic safety issues among US high school students: helmet use while riding a bicycle, seat belt use as a passenger, driving when drinking alcohol, and riding in a car with a driver who had been drinking alcohol.

METHODS

Data from the 1991-2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) were analyzed. The YRBS is a self-administered, anonymous survey that uses a national probability sample of US students in public and private schools in grades 9-12. Demographic subgroup differences were determined for 2007 data using t tests. Temporal changes were analyzed using logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS

From 1991 to 2007, the percentage of high school students who rarely or never wore bicycle helmets decreased from 96.2% to 85.1%; decreases were also seen in the percentage who never wore a seat belt (from 25.9% to 11.1%), rode with a driver who had been drinking alcohol (39.9-29.1%), and who drove when drinking alcohol (16.7-10.5%).

CONCLUSIONS

Although the trends are encouraging, many students still put themselves at risk. Policy approaches (eg, state or local laws or ordinances) complemented by community and school programs may be the best approach to reducing transportation-related injuries and fatalities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, MS K33, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. sce2@cdc.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19292849

Citation

Jones, Sherry E., and Ruth A. Shults. "Trends and Subgroup Differences in Transportation-related Injury Risk and Safety Behaviors Among US High School Students, 1991-2007." The Journal of School Health, vol. 79, no. 4, 2009, pp. 169-76.
Jones SE, Shults RA. Trends and subgroup differences in transportation-related injury risk and safety behaviors among US high school students, 1991-2007. J Sch Health. 2009;79(4):169-76.
Jones, S. E., & Shults, R. A. (2009). Trends and subgroup differences in transportation-related injury risk and safety behaviors among US high school students, 1991-2007. The Journal of School Health, 79(4), pp. 169-76. doi:10.1111/j.1746-1561.2008.00386.x.
Jones SE, Shults RA. Trends and Subgroup Differences in Transportation-related Injury Risk and Safety Behaviors Among US High School Students, 1991-2007. J Sch Health. 2009;79(4):169-76. PubMed PMID: 19292849.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends and subgroup differences in transportation-related injury risk and safety behaviors among US high school students, 1991-2007. AU - Jones,Sherry E, AU - Shults,Ruth A, PY - 2009/3/19/entrez PY - 2009/3/19/pubmed PY - 2009/5/29/medline SP - 169 EP - 76 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 79 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Seventy percent of unintentional injury-related fatalities--the leading cause of death among youth in the United States--are motor vehicle traffic related. Examining traffic-related safety, therefore, is crucial to public health. This study examines trends in traffic safety issues among US high school students: helmet use while riding a bicycle, seat belt use as a passenger, driving when drinking alcohol, and riding in a car with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. METHODS: Data from the 1991-2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) were analyzed. The YRBS is a self-administered, anonymous survey that uses a national probability sample of US students in public and private schools in grades 9-12. Demographic subgroup differences were determined for 2007 data using t tests. Temporal changes were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: From 1991 to 2007, the percentage of high school students who rarely or never wore bicycle helmets decreased from 96.2% to 85.1%; decreases were also seen in the percentage who never wore a seat belt (from 25.9% to 11.1%), rode with a driver who had been drinking alcohol (39.9-29.1%), and who drove when drinking alcohol (16.7-10.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Although the trends are encouraging, many students still put themselves at risk. Policy approaches (eg, state or local laws or ordinances) complemented by community and school programs may be the best approach to reducing transportation-related injuries and fatalities. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19292849/Trends_and_subgroup_differences_in_transportation_related_injury_risk_and_safety_behaviors_among_US_high_school_students_1991_2007_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2008.00386.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -