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Transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II by blood transfusion. A retrospective study of recipients of blood components (1983 through 1988). The American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group.
Arch Intern Med. 1991 Oct; 151(10):2043-8.AI

Abstract

We studied results of a "lookback" program involving laboratory testing and interviews of 133 recipients of prior donations from blood donors seropositive for human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I/II) identified at 28 American Red Cross blood centers. The study was designed to explore the natural course of posttransfusion HTLV-I/II infection among individuals who received blood components from donors subsequently identified as being HTLV-I/II seropositive. Seventeen recipients were seropositive, an apparent transmission rate of 12.8%. Red blood cells and platelets were the implicated components, and red blood cells that were less than 6 days old had a transmission efficiency of 80%. Virus typing enabled documentation of primary and secondary transfusion transmission of HTLV-I and HTLV-II, including the direct transmission of HTLV-II by a donor with a history of intravenous drug use. We conclude that transfusion transmission of HTLV-I/II to approximately 700 recipients per year occurred in the United States before routine donor testing began in 1988.

Authors+Show Affiliations

American Red Cross Blood Services, Rockville, MD 20855.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1929693

Citation

Sullivan, M T., et al. "Transmission of Human T-lymphotropic Virus Types I and II By Blood Transfusion. a Retrospective Study of Recipients of Blood Components (1983 Through 1988). the American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 151, no. 10, 1991, pp. 2043-8.
Sullivan MT, Williams AE, Fang CT, et al. Transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II by blood transfusion. A retrospective study of recipients of blood components (1983 through 1988). The American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group. Arch Intern Med. 1991;151(10):2043-8.
Sullivan, M. T., Williams, A. E., Fang, C. T., Grandinetti, T., Poiesz, B. J., & Ehrlich, G. D. (1991). Transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II by blood transfusion. A retrospective study of recipients of blood components (1983 through 1988). The American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group. Archives of Internal Medicine, 151(10), 2043-8.
Sullivan MT, et al. Transmission of Human T-lymphotropic Virus Types I and II By Blood Transfusion. a Retrospective Study of Recipients of Blood Components (1983 Through 1988). the American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group. Arch Intern Med. 1991;151(10):2043-8. PubMed PMID: 1929693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II by blood transfusion. A retrospective study of recipients of blood components (1983 through 1988). The American Red Cross HTLV-I/II Collaborative Study Group. AU - Sullivan,M T, AU - Williams,A E, AU - Fang,C T, AU - Grandinetti,T, AU - Poiesz,B J, AU - Ehrlich,G D, PY - 1991/10/1/pubmed PY - 1991/10/1/medline PY - 1991/10/1/entrez SP - 2043 EP - 8 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 151 IS - 10 N2 - We studied results of a "lookback" program involving laboratory testing and interviews of 133 recipients of prior donations from blood donors seropositive for human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I/II) identified at 28 American Red Cross blood centers. The study was designed to explore the natural course of posttransfusion HTLV-I/II infection among individuals who received blood components from donors subsequently identified as being HTLV-I/II seropositive. Seventeen recipients were seropositive, an apparent transmission rate of 12.8%. Red blood cells and platelets were the implicated components, and red blood cells that were less than 6 days old had a transmission efficiency of 80%. Virus typing enabled documentation of primary and secondary transfusion transmission of HTLV-I and HTLV-II, including the direct transmission of HTLV-II by a donor with a history of intravenous drug use. We conclude that transfusion transmission of HTLV-I/II to approximately 700 recipients per year occurred in the United States before routine donor testing began in 1988. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1929693/Transmission_of_human_T_lymphotropic_virus_types_I_and_II_by_blood_transfusion__A_retrospective_study_of_recipients_of_blood_components__1983_through_1988___The_American_Red_Cross_HTLV_I/II_Collaborative_Study_Group_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/151/pg/2043 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -