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Tinea capitis among children in the Columbus area, Ohio, USA.
Mycoses. 2010 Mar 01; 53(2):158-62.M

Abstract

Tinea capitis is a fungal infection of the hair follicles of the scalp. In the US, the most common organisms have traditionally been Trichophyton tonsurans, and occasionally Microsporum canis. This study was designed to examine patterns of organisms causing tinea capitis and determine factors associated with infection. A retrospective database analysis was conducted to locate records of patients with tinea capitis from May 2001 to May 2006 at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH. Descriptive statistics, frequency analysis, chi-squared test, and Student's t-test were performed to evaluate types of causative organisms and associated patient characteristics. One hundred and eighty-nine charts of patients with a positive scalp culture for tinea capitis were located. Trichophyton tonsurans (88.9%) was the foremost causative agent followed by Trichophyton violaceum (4.2%). Tinea capitis was more prevalent among African Americans and was more common in urban areas (P < 0.05). Children of African descent inhabiting urban settings were most vulnerable to tinea capitis. The most common organism isolated in this retrospective study was T. tonsurans. Trichophyton violaceum and Trichophyton soudanense were also isolated, which are not commonly reported causes of tinea capitis in the US.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Medicine, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19302461

Citation

Coloe, Jacquelyn R., et al. "Tinea Capitis Among Children in the Columbus Area, Ohio, USA." Mycoses, vol. 53, no. 2, 2010, pp. 158-62.
Coloe JR, Diab M, Moennich J, et al. Tinea capitis among children in the Columbus area, Ohio, USA. Mycoses. 2010;53(2):158-62.
Coloe, J. R., Diab, M., Moennich, J., Diab, D., Pawaskar, M., Balkrishnan, R., & Bechtel, M. A. (2010). Tinea capitis among children in the Columbus area, Ohio, USA. Mycoses, 53(2), 158-62. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0507.2008.01665.x
Coloe JR, et al. Tinea Capitis Among Children in the Columbus Area, Ohio, USA. Mycoses. 2010 Mar 1;53(2):158-62. PubMed PMID: 19302461.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tinea capitis among children in the Columbus area, Ohio, USA. AU - Coloe,Jacquelyn R, AU - Diab,Mohammad, AU - Moennich,Jessica, AU - Diab,Diab, AU - Pawaskar,Manjiri, AU - Balkrishnan,Rajesh, AU - Bechtel,Mark A, Y1 - 2009/03/17/ PY - 2009/3/24/entrez PY - 2009/3/24/pubmed PY - 2010/8/10/medline SP - 158 EP - 62 JF - Mycoses JO - Mycoses VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Tinea capitis is a fungal infection of the hair follicles of the scalp. In the US, the most common organisms have traditionally been Trichophyton tonsurans, and occasionally Microsporum canis. This study was designed to examine patterns of organisms causing tinea capitis and determine factors associated with infection. A retrospective database analysis was conducted to locate records of patients with tinea capitis from May 2001 to May 2006 at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH. Descriptive statistics, frequency analysis, chi-squared test, and Student's t-test were performed to evaluate types of causative organisms and associated patient characteristics. One hundred and eighty-nine charts of patients with a positive scalp culture for tinea capitis were located. Trichophyton tonsurans (88.9%) was the foremost causative agent followed by Trichophyton violaceum (4.2%). Tinea capitis was more prevalent among African Americans and was more common in urban areas (P < 0.05). Children of African descent inhabiting urban settings were most vulnerable to tinea capitis. The most common organism isolated in this retrospective study was T. tonsurans. Trichophyton violaceum and Trichophyton soudanense were also isolated, which are not commonly reported causes of tinea capitis in the US. SN - 1439-0507 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19302461/Tinea_capitis_among_children_in_the_Columbus_area_Ohio_USA_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0507.2008.01665.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -