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Imagining intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice.
Br J Soc Psychol. 2010 Mar; 49(Pt 1):129-42.BJ

Abstract

Recent research has demonstrated that imagining intergroup contact can be sufficient to reduce explicit prejudice directed towards out-groups. In this research, we examined the impact of contact-related mental imagery on implicit prejudice as measured by the implicit association test. We found that, relative to a control condition, young participants who imagined talking to an elderly stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards elderly people in general. In a second study, we demonstrated that, relative to a control condition, non-Muslim participants who imagined talking to a Muslim stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards Muslims in general. We discuss the implications of these findings for furthering the application of indirect contact strategies aimed at improving intergroup relations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS29JT, UK. r.n.turner@leeds.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19302731

Citation

Turner, Rhiannon N., and Richard J. Crisp. "Imagining Intergroup Contact Reduces Implicit Prejudice." The British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 49, no. Pt 1, 2010, pp. 129-42.
Turner RN, Crisp RJ. Imagining intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice. Br J Soc Psychol. 2010;49(Pt 1):129-42.
Turner, R. N., & Crisp, R. J. (2010). Imagining intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 49(Pt 1), 129-42. https://doi.org/10.1348/014466609X419901
Turner RN, Crisp RJ. Imagining Intergroup Contact Reduces Implicit Prejudice. Br J Soc Psychol. 2010;49(Pt 1):129-42. PubMed PMID: 19302731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Imagining intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice. AU - Turner,Rhiannon N, AU - Crisp,Richard J, Y1 - 2009/03/19/ PY - 2009/3/24/entrez PY - 2009/3/24/pubmed PY - 2010/5/29/medline SP - 129 EP - 42 JF - The British journal of social psychology JO - Br J Soc Psychol VL - 49 IS - Pt 1 N2 - Recent research has demonstrated that imagining intergroup contact can be sufficient to reduce explicit prejudice directed towards out-groups. In this research, we examined the impact of contact-related mental imagery on implicit prejudice as measured by the implicit association test. We found that, relative to a control condition, young participants who imagined talking to an elderly stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards elderly people in general. In a second study, we demonstrated that, relative to a control condition, non-Muslim participants who imagined talking to a Muslim stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards Muslims in general. We discuss the implications of these findings for furthering the application of indirect contact strategies aimed at improving intergroup relations. SN - 0144-6665 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19302731/Imagining_intergroup_contact_reduces_implicit_prejudice_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1348/014466609X419901 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -