Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample.
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Apr; 66(4):277-85.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether obesity is associated with a variety of psychiatric outcomes after taking into account physical health conditions.

METHODS

Data came from the public use dataset of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 (age 15 years and older, N=36,984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition psychiatric diagnoses of major depressive disorder, mania, panic attacks, panic disorder, social phobia, agoraphobia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence were examined, as was suicidal behavior (ideation or attempts). Multiple logistic regression was utilized to examine the association between obesity (defined as body mass index >or=30) and mental health outcomes. Covariates in the regressions included sociodemographic factors and a measure of physical illness burden (the Charlson Comorbidity Index).

RESULTS

In adjusted models, obesity was positively related to several lifetime psychiatric disorders (depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, agoraphobia without panic disorder), any lifetime mood or anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) range: 1.22-1.58]. Obesity was similarly positively associated with past-year depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, any anxiety disorder, and suicidal ideation (AOR range: 1.24-1.52), and negatively associated with past-year drug dependence (AOR=0.53, 95% CI 0.31-0.89). Most of these associations were found to be specific to women, while some were also present in men.

CONCLUSION

Independent of physical health conditions, obesity was associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior in the Canadian population. Possible mechanisms and clinical implications of these findings are considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19302884

Citation

Mather, Amber A., et al. "Associations of Obesity With Psychiatric Disorders and Suicidal Behaviors in a Nationally Representative Sample." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 66, no. 4, 2009, pp. 277-85.
Mather AA, Cox BJ, Enns MW, et al. Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample. J Psychosom Res. 2009;66(4):277-85.
Mather, A. A., Cox, B. J., Enns, M. W., & Sareen, J. (2009). Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 66(4), 277-85. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2008.09.008
Mather AA, et al. Associations of Obesity With Psychiatric Disorders and Suicidal Behaviors in a Nationally Representative Sample. J Psychosom Res. 2009;66(4):277-85. PubMed PMID: 19302884.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of obesity with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviors in a nationally representative sample. AU - Mather,Amber A, AU - Cox,Brian J, AU - Enns,Murray W, AU - Sareen,Jitender, Y1 - 2008/11/22/ PY - 2007/06/19/received PY - 2008/04/08/revised PY - 2008/09/05/accepted PY - 2009/3/24/entrez PY - 2009/3/24/pubmed PY - 2009/7/16/medline SP - 277 EP - 85 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 66 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether obesity is associated with a variety of psychiatric outcomes after taking into account physical health conditions. METHODS: Data came from the public use dataset of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 (age 15 years and older, N=36,984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition psychiatric diagnoses of major depressive disorder, mania, panic attacks, panic disorder, social phobia, agoraphobia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence were examined, as was suicidal behavior (ideation or attempts). Multiple logistic regression was utilized to examine the association between obesity (defined as body mass index >or=30) and mental health outcomes. Covariates in the regressions included sociodemographic factors and a measure of physical illness burden (the Charlson Comorbidity Index). RESULTS: In adjusted models, obesity was positively related to several lifetime psychiatric disorders (depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, agoraphobia without panic disorder), any lifetime mood or anxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) range: 1.22-1.58]. Obesity was similarly positively associated with past-year depression, mania, panic attacks, social phobia, any anxiety disorder, and suicidal ideation (AOR range: 1.24-1.52), and negatively associated with past-year drug dependence (AOR=0.53, 95% CI 0.31-0.89). Most of these associations were found to be specific to women, while some were also present in men. CONCLUSION: Independent of physical health conditions, obesity was associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior in the Canadian population. Possible mechanisms and clinical implications of these findings are considered. SN - 1879-1360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19302884/Associations_of_obesity_with_psychiatric_disorders_and_suicidal_behaviors_in_a_nationally_representative_sample_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(08)00429-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -