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Self-reporting weight and height: misclassification effect on the risk estimates for acute myocardial infarction.
Eur J Public Health. 2009 Oct; 19(5):548-53.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The accuracy of self-reported weight and height to measure obesity has been evaluated, but no information is available on the possible error effects of self-reporting when estimating the association between body mass index (BMI) categories and the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We aim to evaluate if two different sources of information on height and weight (reported vs. measured) result in different risk estimates for non-fatal AMI events.

METHODS

A population-based case-control study was conducted with 732 cases of first AMI and 1914 community controls, recruited from the same catchment area of hospitals. As part of an interview, participants self-reported weight and height immediately before having it measured. Data were analysed separately by sex and age strata (< or =45; >45 years).

RESULTS

Women under-reported their weight and over-reported their height, and the mean differences between measured and self-reported data were significantly larger in controls. Male controls also under-reported their weight, but cases over-reported it. After adjustment, in younger women the use of self-reported data underestimated the AMI risk according to BMI categories, but in older ones the self-reporting overestimated AMI risk, although with no statistical significance. In younger men, the association between AMI and self-reported obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)) was overestimated in approximately 50% (measured: OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.08-3.87; self-reported: OR = 3.06, 95% CI 1.56-6.00). In older participants, a significant association was only found for overweight men when using self-reported data.

CONCLUSIONS

Self-reporting of height and weight produced a differential misclassification and biased risks for AMI according to BMI, affecting not only the magnitude, but also the estimates direction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology of University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19304731

Citation

Oliveira, Andreia, et al. "Self-reporting Weight and Height: Misclassification Effect On the Risk Estimates for Acute Myocardial Infarction." European Journal of Public Health, vol. 19, no. 5, 2009, pp. 548-53.
Oliveira A, Ramos E, Lopes C, et al. Self-reporting weight and height: misclassification effect on the risk estimates for acute myocardial infarction. Eur J Public Health. 2009;19(5):548-53.
Oliveira, A., Ramos, E., Lopes, C., & Barros, H. (2009). Self-reporting weight and height: misclassification effect on the risk estimates for acute myocardial infarction. European Journal of Public Health, 19(5), 548-53. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckp022
Oliveira A, et al. Self-reporting Weight and Height: Misclassification Effect On the Risk Estimates for Acute Myocardial Infarction. Eur J Public Health. 2009;19(5):548-53. PubMed PMID: 19304731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reporting weight and height: misclassification effect on the risk estimates for acute myocardial infarction. AU - Oliveira,Andreia, AU - Ramos,Elisabete, AU - Lopes,Carla, AU - Barros,Henrique, Y1 - 2009/03/19/ PY - 2009/3/24/entrez PY - 2009/3/24/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 548 EP - 53 JF - European journal of public health JO - Eur J Public Health VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The accuracy of self-reported weight and height to measure obesity has been evaluated, but no information is available on the possible error effects of self-reporting when estimating the association between body mass index (BMI) categories and the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We aim to evaluate if two different sources of information on height and weight (reported vs. measured) result in different risk estimates for non-fatal AMI events. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted with 732 cases of first AMI and 1914 community controls, recruited from the same catchment area of hospitals. As part of an interview, participants self-reported weight and height immediately before having it measured. Data were analysed separately by sex and age strata (< or =45; >45 years). RESULTS: Women under-reported their weight and over-reported their height, and the mean differences between measured and self-reported data were significantly larger in controls. Male controls also under-reported their weight, but cases over-reported it. After adjustment, in younger women the use of self-reported data underestimated the AMI risk according to BMI categories, but in older ones the self-reporting overestimated AMI risk, although with no statistical significance. In younger men, the association between AMI and self-reported obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)) was overestimated in approximately 50% (measured: OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.08-3.87; self-reported: OR = 3.06, 95% CI 1.56-6.00). In older participants, a significant association was only found for overweight men when using self-reported data. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reporting of height and weight produced a differential misclassification and biased risks for AMI according to BMI, affecting not only the magnitude, but also the estimates direction. SN - 1464-360X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19304731/Self_reporting_weight_and_height:_misclassification_effect_on_the_risk_estimates_for_acute_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/eurpub/ckp022 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -