Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study.
Arch Intern Med 2009; 169(6):603-9AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol and gallstone disease are the most established risk factors for pancreatitis. Smoking is rarely considered to be a cause despite the fact that a few studies have indicated the opposite. We aimed to assess the independent effects of smoking on the risk of pancreatitis.

METHODS

We used data from an observational, population-based cohort study conducted in Denmark. Participants were 9573 women and 8332 men who were followed up for a mean of 20.2 years. Participants underwent a physical examination and completed self-administered questionnaires about lifestyle habits. Information on incident cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were obtained by record linkage with the Danish national registries.

RESULTS

A total of 235 cases of pancreatitis occurred during follow-up. A dose-response association between smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis was observed in both men and women. For example, the hazard ratio of developing pancreatitis was 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-4.7) among women and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1-6.2) among men who smoked 15 to 24 grams of tobacco per day. Alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.14 for each additional drink per day). The risk of pancreatitis associated with smoking, however, was independent of alcohol and gallstone disease. Approximately 46% of cases of pancreatitis were attributable to smoking in this cohort.

CONCLUSION

In this population of Danish men and women, smoking was independently associated with increased risk of pancreatitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen K, Denmark. jst@niph.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19307524

Citation

Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann, et al. "Smoking and Risk of Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis Among Women and Men: a Population-based Cohort Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 169, no. 6, 2009, pp. 603-9.
Tolstrup JS, Kristiansen L, Becker U, et al. Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(6):603-9.
Tolstrup, J. S., Kristiansen, L., Becker, U., & Grønbaek, M. (2009). Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 169(6), pp. 603-9. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2008.601.
Tolstrup JS, et al. Smoking and Risk of Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis Among Women and Men: a Population-based Cohort Study. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):603-9. PubMed PMID: 19307524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study. AU - Tolstrup,Janne Schurmann, AU - Kristiansen,Louise, AU - Becker,Ulrik, AU - Grønbaek,Morten, PY - 2009/3/25/entrez PY - 2009/3/25/pubmed PY - 2009/4/22/medline SP - 603 EP - 9 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 169 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol and gallstone disease are the most established risk factors for pancreatitis. Smoking is rarely considered to be a cause despite the fact that a few studies have indicated the opposite. We aimed to assess the independent effects of smoking on the risk of pancreatitis. METHODS: We used data from an observational, population-based cohort study conducted in Denmark. Participants were 9573 women and 8332 men who were followed up for a mean of 20.2 years. Participants underwent a physical examination and completed self-administered questionnaires about lifestyle habits. Information on incident cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were obtained by record linkage with the Danish national registries. RESULTS: A total of 235 cases of pancreatitis occurred during follow-up. A dose-response association between smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis was observed in both men and women. For example, the hazard ratio of developing pancreatitis was 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-4.7) among women and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1-6.2) among men who smoked 15 to 24 grams of tobacco per day. Alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.14 for each additional drink per day). The risk of pancreatitis associated with smoking, however, was independent of alcohol and gallstone disease. Approximately 46% of cases of pancreatitis were attributable to smoking in this cohort. CONCLUSION: In this population of Danish men and women, smoking was independently associated with increased risk of pancreatitis. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19307524/Smoking_and_risk_of_acute_and_chronic_pancreatitis_among_women_and_men:_a_population_based_cohort_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinternmed.2008.601 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -