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Brain structures involved in visual search in the presence and absence of color singletons.
J Cogn Neurosci. 2010 Apr; 22(4):761-74.JC

Abstract

It is still debated to what degree top-down and bottom-up driven attentional control processes are subserved by shared or by separate mechanisms. Interactions between these attentional control forms were investigated using a rapid event-related fMRI design, using an attentional search task. Following a prestimulus mask, target stimuli (consisting of a letter C or a mirror image of the C, enclosed in a diamond outline) were presented either at one unique location among three nontarget items (consisting of a random letter, enclosed in a circle outline; 50% probability), or at all four possible target locations (also 50% probability). On half the trials, irrelevant color singletons were presented, consisting of a color change of one of the four prestimulus masks, just prior to target appearance. Participants were required to search for a target letter inside the diamond and report its orientation. Results indicate that, in addition to a common network of parietal areas, medial frontal cortex is uniquely involved in top-down orienting, whereas bottom-up control is mainly subserved by a network of occipital and parietal areas. Additionally, we found that participants who were better able to suppress orienting to the color singleton showed middle frontal gyrus activation, and that the degree of top-down control correlated with insular activity. We conclude that, in addition to a common set of parietal areas, separate brain areas are involved in top-down and bottom-up driven attentional control, and that frontal areas play a role in the suppression of attentional capture by an irrelevant color singleton.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. d.talsma@utwente.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19309291

Citation

Talsma, Durk, et al. "Brain Structures Involved in Visual Search in the Presence and Absence of Color Singletons." Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 22, no. 4, 2010, pp. 761-74.
Talsma D, Coe B, Munoz DP, et al. Brain structures involved in visual search in the presence and absence of color singletons. J Cogn Neurosci. 2010;22(4):761-74.
Talsma, D., Coe, B., Munoz, D. P., & Theeuwes, J. (2010). Brain structures involved in visual search in the presence and absence of color singletons. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 22(4), 761-74. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2009.21223
Talsma D, et al. Brain Structures Involved in Visual Search in the Presence and Absence of Color Singletons. J Cogn Neurosci. 2010;22(4):761-74. PubMed PMID: 19309291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain structures involved in visual search in the presence and absence of color singletons. AU - Talsma,Durk, AU - Coe,Brian, AU - Munoz,Douglas P, AU - Theeuwes,Jan, PY - 2009/3/25/entrez PY - 2009/3/25/pubmed PY - 2010/5/13/medline SP - 761 EP - 74 JF - Journal of cognitive neuroscience JO - J Cogn Neurosci VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - It is still debated to what degree top-down and bottom-up driven attentional control processes are subserved by shared or by separate mechanisms. Interactions between these attentional control forms were investigated using a rapid event-related fMRI design, using an attentional search task. Following a prestimulus mask, target stimuli (consisting of a letter C or a mirror image of the C, enclosed in a diamond outline) were presented either at one unique location among three nontarget items (consisting of a random letter, enclosed in a circle outline; 50% probability), or at all four possible target locations (also 50% probability). On half the trials, irrelevant color singletons were presented, consisting of a color change of one of the four prestimulus masks, just prior to target appearance. Participants were required to search for a target letter inside the diamond and report its orientation. Results indicate that, in addition to a common network of parietal areas, medial frontal cortex is uniquely involved in top-down orienting, whereas bottom-up control is mainly subserved by a network of occipital and parietal areas. Additionally, we found that participants who were better able to suppress orienting to the color singleton showed middle frontal gyrus activation, and that the degree of top-down control correlated with insular activity. We conclude that, in addition to a common set of parietal areas, separate brain areas are involved in top-down and bottom-up driven attentional control, and that frontal areas play a role in the suppression of attentional capture by an irrelevant color singleton. SN - 1530-8898 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19309291/Brain_structures_involved_in_visual_search_in_the_presence_and_absence_of_color_singletons_ L2 - https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/10.1162/jocn.2009.21223?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -