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Effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid on experimental human rhinovirus infection and illness.
Antivir Ther 2009; 14(1):33-43AT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Because studies suggest that the dietary supplement conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has immunomodulatory activities that might benefit common colds, we performed two studies of CLA effects in experimental human rhinovirus (HRV) infection.

METHODS

The first study explored whether CLA supplementation (Safflorin; Loders Croklaan, BV, Wormerveer, the Netherlands) altered the virological or clinical course of experimental HRV infection, and the second explored whether CLA affected the frequency and severity of HRV cold-associated sore throat and cough. The trials were randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled. In total, 50 healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years and susceptible to HRV type-39 (serum neutralizing antibody titre < or = 1:2) participated in study 1 and 80 similar volunteers susceptible to Hank's HRV participated in study 2. Participants ingested CLA 2 g/day or placebo for 4 weeks before and 4 days following intranasal HRV inoculation. The primary endpoint for study 1 was the frequency of colds and for study 2 was the symptom severity scores for sore throat and cough.

RESULTS

In study 1, 10/24 (42%) placebo compared with 7/21 (33%) CLA participants developed colds (P = 0.53). CLA was associated with significant reductions in mean scores for cough (0 CLA versus 0.9 placebo) and sore throat (0.8 CLA versus 2.9 placebo). In study 2, clinical colds developed in 19/33 (58%) placebo and 27/43 (63%) CLA participants. Symptom scores for cough (0.9 CLA versus 1.0 placebo) and sore throat (2.6 CLA versus 3.2 placebo) were not significantly different. Similarly no differences in nasal viral titres or serological responses were found.

CONCLUSIONS

CLA dietary supplementation had no consistent effects on the virological or clinical course of experimental HRV colds. A larger study would be required to detect more subtle effects of CLA on HRV cold-associated symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. kmp5v@virginia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19320235

Citation

Peterson, Kristine M., et al. "Effects of Dietary Supplementation With Conjugated Linoleic Acid On Experimental Human Rhinovirus Infection and Illness." Antiviral Therapy, vol. 14, no. 1, 2009, pp. 33-43.
Peterson KM, O'Shea M, Stam W, et al. Effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid on experimental human rhinovirus infection and illness. Antivir Ther (Lond). 2009;14(1):33-43.
Peterson, K. M., O'Shea, M., Stam, W., Mohede, I. C., Patrie, J. T., & Hayden, F. G. (2009). Effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid on experimental human rhinovirus infection and illness. Antiviral Therapy, 14(1), pp. 33-43.
Peterson KM, et al. Effects of Dietary Supplementation With Conjugated Linoleic Acid On Experimental Human Rhinovirus Infection and Illness. Antivir Ther (Lond). 2009;14(1):33-43. PubMed PMID: 19320235.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid on experimental human rhinovirus infection and illness. AU - Peterson,Kristine M, AU - O'Shea,Marianne, AU - Stam,Wiro, AU - Mohede,Inge C M, AU - Patrie,James T, AU - Hayden,Frederick G, PY - 2009/3/27/entrez PY - 2009/3/27/pubmed PY - 2009/4/15/medline SP - 33 EP - 43 JF - Antiviral therapy JO - Antivir. Ther. (Lond.) VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Because studies suggest that the dietary supplement conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has immunomodulatory activities that might benefit common colds, we performed two studies of CLA effects in experimental human rhinovirus (HRV) infection. METHODS: The first study explored whether CLA supplementation (Safflorin; Loders Croklaan, BV, Wormerveer, the Netherlands) altered the virological or clinical course of experimental HRV infection, and the second explored whether CLA affected the frequency and severity of HRV cold-associated sore throat and cough. The trials were randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled. In total, 50 healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years and susceptible to HRV type-39 (serum neutralizing antibody titre < or = 1:2) participated in study 1 and 80 similar volunteers susceptible to Hank's HRV participated in study 2. Participants ingested CLA 2 g/day or placebo for 4 weeks before and 4 days following intranasal HRV inoculation. The primary endpoint for study 1 was the frequency of colds and for study 2 was the symptom severity scores for sore throat and cough. RESULTS: In study 1, 10/24 (42%) placebo compared with 7/21 (33%) CLA participants developed colds (P = 0.53). CLA was associated with significant reductions in mean scores for cough (0 CLA versus 0.9 placebo) and sore throat (0.8 CLA versus 2.9 placebo). In study 2, clinical colds developed in 19/33 (58%) placebo and 27/43 (63%) CLA participants. Symptom scores for cough (0.9 CLA versus 1.0 placebo) and sore throat (2.6 CLA versus 3.2 placebo) were not significantly different. Similarly no differences in nasal viral titres or serological responses were found. CONCLUSIONS: CLA dietary supplementation had no consistent effects on the virological or clinical course of experimental HRV colds. A larger study would be required to detect more subtle effects of CLA on HRV cold-associated symptoms. SN - 1359-6535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19320235/Effects_of_dietary_supplementation_with_conjugated_linoleic_acid_on_experimental_human_rhinovirus_infection_and_illness_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/commoncold.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -