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Relationship of postprandial nonesterified fatty acids, adipokines, and insulin across gender in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy.
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2009 Jun; 7(3):199-204.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Metabolic derangements are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive subjects undergoing antiretroviral therapy, but little is known about postprandial conditions.

METHODS

We investigated the relationship between leptin, adiponectin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and insulin in response to a day-long meal pattern and evaluated gender differences in HIV-positive men (n = 12) and women (n = 13) undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

RESULTS

For both men and women, a significant decrease in postprandial NEFA levels was observed following breakfast (0.53 vs. 0.22 mmol/L, P < 0.001, baseline and at 3 hours, respectively), whereas day-long postprandial leptin and adiponectin levels showed small nonsignificant oscillations. In contrast to NEFA and adiponectin, postprandial leptin levels were significantly higher among women compared to men (P < 0.05). Postprandial NEFA levels correlated positively with fasting insulin levels (r(2) = 0.25, P = 0.016), and the postbreakfast decrease in NEFA levels correlated significantly with the postbreakfast increase in insulin levels (r(2) = 0.17, P = 0.038). No significant association between postprandial adipokines and insulin was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

In HAART-treated, HIV-infected men and women, levels of NEFA, but not adipokines, showed significant postprandial variation. Furthermore, food intake resulted in significant NEFA suppression in proportion to the food-stimulated insulin increase.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19320559

Citation

Lu, Guijing, et al. "Relationship of Postprandial Nonesterified Fatty Acids, Adipokines, and Insulin Across Gender in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, vol. 7, no. 3, 2009, pp. 199-204.
Lu G, Thomas-Geevarghese A, Anuurad E, et al. Relationship of postprandial nonesterified fatty acids, adipokines, and insulin across gender in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2009;7(3):199-204.
Lu, G., Thomas-Geevarghese, A., Anuurad, E., Raghavan, S., Minolfo, R., Ormsby, B., Karmally, W., El-Sadr, W. M., Albu, J., & Berglund, L. (2009). Relationship of postprandial nonesterified fatty acids, adipokines, and insulin across gender in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 7(3), 199-204. https://doi.org/10.1089/met.2008.0066
Lu G, et al. Relationship of Postprandial Nonesterified Fatty Acids, Adipokines, and Insulin Across Gender in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2009;7(3):199-204. PubMed PMID: 19320559.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of postprandial nonesterified fatty acids, adipokines, and insulin across gender in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy. AU - Lu,Guijing, AU - Thomas-Geevarghese,Asha, AU - Anuurad,Erdembileg, AU - Raghavan,Subhashree, AU - Minolfo,Robert, AU - Ormsby,Bernard, AU - Karmally,Wahida, AU - El-Sadr,Wafaa M, AU - Albu,Jeanine, AU - Berglund,Lars, PY - 2009/3/27/entrez PY - 2009/3/27/pubmed PY - 2009/8/15/medline SP - 199 EP - 204 JF - Metabolic syndrome and related disorders JO - Metab Syndr Relat Disord VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Metabolic derangements are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive subjects undergoing antiretroviral therapy, but little is known about postprandial conditions. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between leptin, adiponectin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and insulin in response to a day-long meal pattern and evaluated gender differences in HIV-positive men (n = 12) and women (n = 13) undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). RESULTS: For both men and women, a significant decrease in postprandial NEFA levels was observed following breakfast (0.53 vs. 0.22 mmol/L, P < 0.001, baseline and at 3 hours, respectively), whereas day-long postprandial leptin and adiponectin levels showed small nonsignificant oscillations. In contrast to NEFA and adiponectin, postprandial leptin levels were significantly higher among women compared to men (P < 0.05). Postprandial NEFA levels correlated positively with fasting insulin levels (r(2) = 0.25, P = 0.016), and the postbreakfast decrease in NEFA levels correlated significantly with the postbreakfast increase in insulin levels (r(2) = 0.17, P = 0.038). No significant association between postprandial adipokines and insulin was observed. CONCLUSIONS: In HAART-treated, HIV-infected men and women, levels of NEFA, but not adipokines, showed significant postprandial variation. Furthermore, food intake resulted in significant NEFA suppression in proportion to the food-stimulated insulin increase. SN - 1557-8518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19320559/Relationship_of_postprandial_nonesterified_fatty_acids_adipokines_and_insulin_across_gender_in_human_immunodeficiency_virus_positive_patients_undergoing_highly_active_antiretroviral_therapy_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/met.2008.0066?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -