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Comparison of three commercially available prescription diet regimens on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy cats.
Vet Res Commun. 2009 Oct; 33(7):669-80.VR

Abstract

Dietary therapy is an important treatment component for diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, the impact of three different commercially available diet regiments (1 general use and 2 aimed for treating obesity and DM) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations of five healthy cats to better understand what impact each of these diets may have for diabetic cats. The diet regiments used in this study were as follows: C/D dry (General Use- Low protein, High fat, High carbohydrate, and Low fiber), M/D dry (DM- High protein, High fat, Low carbohydrate, and High Fiber), and W/D dry (DM- Low Protein, Low Fat, High Carbohydrate, and High Fiber). No significant difference in post-prandial serum glucose levels were observed with the C/D (84.6 +/- 1.5 mg/dl) and W/D (83.8 +/- 1.4 mg/dl) dry diets when compared to pre-prandial fasting levels (83.9 +/- 1.4 mg/dl). However, a significant reduction was observed with the M/D diet (78.9 +/- 0.8 mg/dl) which had 50-60% less carbohydrates than either C/D or W/D diet. Unlike what was observed with post-prandial glucose levels, an interesting pattern emerged with post-prandial insulin levels, which were increasing with W/D, C/D, and M/D diets in that order (1.1 +/- 0.2, 1.7 +/- 0.2, and 2.3 +/- 0.2 ng/ml respectively). Most surprising, though, was the fact that the W/D diet did not seem to stimulate insulin secretion as compared to pre-prandial levels (1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml) in healthy cats. Interestingly, the W/D diet had high levels of carbohydrate and low levels of protein. Coincidentally, the only diet (M/D) which had a significant reduction in post-prandial glucose also showed the highest increase in post-prandial insulin in healthy cats. Therefore, dietary amounts of carbohydrate, fat, protein and fiber can all have an individual impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels. Just as concepts regarding dietary management of people with DM are evolving, investigators are reassessing what constitutes the ideal diet for the diabetic feline. As such, having a better understanding for each dietary component, may lead us to better understand how we can synergize certain dietary components to aid in DM management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonancho, Musashino, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan. d0608@nvlu.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19322671

Citation

Mori, A, et al. "Comparison of Three Commercially Available Prescription Diet Regimens On Short-term Post-prandial Serum Glucose and Insulin Concentrations in Healthy Cats." Veterinary Research Communications, vol. 33, no. 7, 2009, pp. 669-80.
Mori A, Sako T, Lee P, et al. Comparison of three commercially available prescription diet regimens on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy cats. Vet Res Commun. 2009;33(7):669-80.
Mori, A., Sako, T., Lee, P., Nishimaki, Y., Fukuta, H., Mizutani, H., Honjo, T., & Arai, T. (2009). Comparison of three commercially available prescription diet regimens on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy cats. Veterinary Research Communications, 33(7), 669-80. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11259-009-9216-5
Mori A, et al. Comparison of Three Commercially Available Prescription Diet Regimens On Short-term Post-prandial Serum Glucose and Insulin Concentrations in Healthy Cats. Vet Res Commun. 2009;33(7):669-80. PubMed PMID: 19322671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of three commercially available prescription diet regimens on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy cats. AU - Mori,A, AU - Sako,T, AU - Lee,P, AU - Nishimaki,Y, AU - Fukuta,H, AU - Mizutani,H, AU - Honjo,T, AU - Arai,T, Y1 - 2009/03/26/ PY - 2008/11/25/received PY - 2009/03/05/accepted PY - 2009/3/27/entrez PY - 2009/3/27/pubmed PY - 2010/1/16/medline SP - 669 EP - 80 JF - Veterinary research communications JO - Vet Res Commun VL - 33 IS - 7 N2 - Dietary therapy is an important treatment component for diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, the impact of three different commercially available diet regiments (1 general use and 2 aimed for treating obesity and DM) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose and insulin concentrations of five healthy cats to better understand what impact each of these diets may have for diabetic cats. The diet regiments used in this study were as follows: C/D dry (General Use- Low protein, High fat, High carbohydrate, and Low fiber), M/D dry (DM- High protein, High fat, Low carbohydrate, and High Fiber), and W/D dry (DM- Low Protein, Low Fat, High Carbohydrate, and High Fiber). No significant difference in post-prandial serum glucose levels were observed with the C/D (84.6 +/- 1.5 mg/dl) and W/D (83.8 +/- 1.4 mg/dl) dry diets when compared to pre-prandial fasting levels (83.9 +/- 1.4 mg/dl). However, a significant reduction was observed with the M/D diet (78.9 +/- 0.8 mg/dl) which had 50-60% less carbohydrates than either C/D or W/D diet. Unlike what was observed with post-prandial glucose levels, an interesting pattern emerged with post-prandial insulin levels, which were increasing with W/D, C/D, and M/D diets in that order (1.1 +/- 0.2, 1.7 +/- 0.2, and 2.3 +/- 0.2 ng/ml respectively). Most surprising, though, was the fact that the W/D diet did not seem to stimulate insulin secretion as compared to pre-prandial levels (1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml) in healthy cats. Interestingly, the W/D diet had high levels of carbohydrate and low levels of protein. Coincidentally, the only diet (M/D) which had a significant reduction in post-prandial glucose also showed the highest increase in post-prandial insulin in healthy cats. Therefore, dietary amounts of carbohydrate, fat, protein and fiber can all have an individual impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels. Just as concepts regarding dietary management of people with DM are evolving, investigators are reassessing what constitutes the ideal diet for the diabetic feline. As such, having a better understanding for each dietary component, may lead us to better understand how we can synergize certain dietary components to aid in DM management. SN - 1573-7446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19322671/Comparison_of_three_commercially_available_prescription_diet_regimens_on_short_term_post_prandial_serum_glucose_and_insulin_concentrations_in_healthy_cats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11259-009-9216-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -