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Social anxiety and the experience of positive emotion and anger in everyday life: an ecological momentary assessment approach.
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010 May; 23(3):259-72.AS

Abstract

A few recent studies have found evidence showing that social anxiety is associated with diminished positive affect and elevated anger. However, prior work has relied on trait self-report measures of global positive mood or anger. In this preliminary study, we examined how trait social anxiety relates to moment-to-moment positive and angry emotional states as people navigate through their natural environment in a given day. Of additional interest was whether any associations were limited to social situations or were evident more broadly in non-social situations as well. For 14 days, 38 non-clinical community adults carried electronic diaries to assess their experience of positive emotions, anger, and their current social context and activity. Participants were randomly prompted up to four times per day, leading to 1702 observations. Results showed that social anxiety was associated with less time spent feeling happy and relaxed and more time spent feeling angry throughout the day. In general, people felt happier when they were with other people compared to being alone. Interestingly, people with relatively higher levels of social anxiety reported fewer and less intense positive emotions and greater anger episodes across social and non-social situations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. tkashdan@gmu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19326272

Citation

Kashdan, Todd B., and R Lorraine Collins. "Social Anxiety and the Experience of Positive Emotion and Anger in Everyday Life: an Ecological Momentary Assessment Approach." Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, vol. 23, no. 3, 2010, pp. 259-72.
Kashdan TB, Collins RL. Social anxiety and the experience of positive emotion and anger in everyday life: an ecological momentary assessment approach. Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010;23(3):259-72.
Kashdan, T. B., & Collins, R. L. (2010). Social anxiety and the experience of positive emotion and anger in everyday life: an ecological momentary assessment approach. Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, 23(3), 259-72. https://doi.org/10.1080/10615800802641950
Kashdan TB, Collins RL. Social Anxiety and the Experience of Positive Emotion and Anger in Everyday Life: an Ecological Momentary Assessment Approach. Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010;23(3):259-72. PubMed PMID: 19326272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social anxiety and the experience of positive emotion and anger in everyday life: an ecological momentary assessment approach. AU - Kashdan,Todd B, AU - Collins,R Lorraine, PY - 2009/3/28/entrez PY - 2009/3/28/pubmed PY - 2010/7/8/medline SP - 259 EP - 72 JF - Anxiety, stress, and coping JO - Anxiety Stress Coping VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - A few recent studies have found evidence showing that social anxiety is associated with diminished positive affect and elevated anger. However, prior work has relied on trait self-report measures of global positive mood or anger. In this preliminary study, we examined how trait social anxiety relates to moment-to-moment positive and angry emotional states as people navigate through their natural environment in a given day. Of additional interest was whether any associations were limited to social situations or were evident more broadly in non-social situations as well. For 14 days, 38 non-clinical community adults carried electronic diaries to assess their experience of positive emotions, anger, and their current social context and activity. Participants were randomly prompted up to four times per day, leading to 1702 observations. Results showed that social anxiety was associated with less time spent feeling happy and relaxed and more time spent feeling angry throughout the day. In general, people felt happier when they were with other people compared to being alone. Interestingly, people with relatively higher levels of social anxiety reported fewer and less intense positive emotions and greater anger episodes across social and non-social situations. SN - 1477-2205 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19326272/Social_anxiety_and_the_experience_of_positive_emotion_and_anger_in_everyday_life:_an_ecological_momentary_assessment_approach_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10615800802641950 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -