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Vitamin E intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Int J Cancer 2009; 125(1):165-70IJ

Abstract

We investigated the association of dietary alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and supplemental vitamin E intake with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 158), esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 382), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (n = 320) and gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA; n = 327) in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a cohort of approximately 500,000 people. Data on dietary and supplemental vitamin E intake were collected using a validated questionnaire at baseline and were analyzed using Cox regression models. Intakes were analyzed as continuous variables and as quartiles. For dietary alpha-tocopherol, we found some evidence of association with decreased esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and increased esophageal adenocarcinoma risk in the continuous analyses, with adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of 0.90 (0.81-0.99) and 1.05 (1.00-1.11), respectively, per 1.17 mg (half the interquartile range) increased intake. However, in quartile analyses, the p value for trend was nonsignificant for both these cancers. There was no association between dietary alpha-tocopherol and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma or GNCA. We observed no statistically significant associations with gamma-tocopherol. For supplemental vitamin E, the results were mainly null, except for a significantly lower risk of GNCA with higher doses of supplemental vitamin E. An increase of 71 mg/day (half the interquartile range) in supplemental vitamin E had an hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.92 (0.85-1.00) and the p value for trend in the quartile analysis was 0.015.

Authors+Show Affiliations

NEB/DCEG, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7232, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19326432

Citation

Carman, Sarah, et al. "Vitamin E Intake and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 125, no. 1, 2009, pp. 165-70.
Carman S, Kamangar F, Freedman ND, et al. Vitamin E intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Int J Cancer. 2009;125(1):165-70.
Carman, S., Kamangar, F., Freedman, N. D., Wright, M. E., Dawsey, S. M., Dixon, L. B., ... Abnet, C. C. (2009). Vitamin E intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. International Journal of Cancer, 125(1), pp. 165-70. doi:10.1002/ijc.24342.
Carman S, et al. Vitamin E Intake and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Int J Cancer. 2009 Jul 1;125(1):165-70. PubMed PMID: 19326432.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. AU - Carman,Sarah, AU - Kamangar,Farin, AU - Freedman,Neal D, AU - Wright,Margaret E, AU - Dawsey,Sanford M, AU - Dixon,L Beth, AU - Subar,Amy, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Abnet,Christian C, PY - 2009/3/28/entrez PY - 2009/3/28/pubmed PY - 2009/5/29/medline SP - 165 EP - 70 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 125 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated the association of dietary alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and supplemental vitamin E intake with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 158), esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 382), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (n = 320) and gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA; n = 327) in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, a cohort of approximately 500,000 people. Data on dietary and supplemental vitamin E intake were collected using a validated questionnaire at baseline and were analyzed using Cox regression models. Intakes were analyzed as continuous variables and as quartiles. For dietary alpha-tocopherol, we found some evidence of association with decreased esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and increased esophageal adenocarcinoma risk in the continuous analyses, with adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of 0.90 (0.81-0.99) and 1.05 (1.00-1.11), respectively, per 1.17 mg (half the interquartile range) increased intake. However, in quartile analyses, the p value for trend was nonsignificant for both these cancers. There was no association between dietary alpha-tocopherol and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma or GNCA. We observed no statistically significant associations with gamma-tocopherol. For supplemental vitamin E, the results were mainly null, except for a significantly lower risk of GNCA with higher doses of supplemental vitamin E. An increase of 71 mg/day (half the interquartile range) in supplemental vitamin E had an hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.92 (0.85-1.00) and the p value for trend in the quartile analysis was 0.015. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19326432/Vitamin_E_intake_and_risk_of_esophageal_and_gastric_cancers_in_the_NIH_AARP_Diet_and_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24342 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -