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Usefulness of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as an independent predictor of one-year mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions.
Am J Cardiol. 2009 Apr 01; 103(7):902-6.AJ

Abstract

Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are a marker of coronary artery disease progression and are associated with cardiovascular events. However, whether low HDL cholesterol is a useful prognostic indicator after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not known. In a sample of 4,088 patients who underwent PCI we evaluated 1-year mortality and repeat revascularization as a function of baseline HDL levels classified into approximate quartiles of very low (<35 mg/dl), low (35 to 40 mg/dl), medium (41 to 47 mg/dl) and high (48 to 120 mg/dl) HDL cholesterol. Decreasing levels of HDL cholesterol were associated with younger age, male gender, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and a history of bypass surgery (p <0.0001 for all). One-year mortality and coronary revascularization were significantly higher in the very low HDL cholesterol group compared with the other groups (very low HDL cholesterol 6.5% and 25.4%, respectively; low HDL cholesterol 3.1% and 20.8%; medium HDL cholesterol 4.3% and 22.7%; high HDL cholesterol 3.1% and 20.6%, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.007). One-year mortality was significantly higher in men with an HDL cholesterol level <33 mg/dL and in women with an HDL cholesterol level <38 mg/dL. In multivariable analysis, very low HDL was associated with nearly twofold the risk of death after adjusting for other independent predictors of outcome. In conclusion, in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI, a baseline HDL cholesterol level <35 mg/dl is an important prognostic indicator. Baseline HDL cholesterol levels <33 mg/dl for men and <38 mg/dl were associated with higher one-year mortality after PCI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ziyad.ghazzal@emoryhealthcare.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19327413

Citation

Ghazzal, Ziyad B., et al. "Usefulness of Serum High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level as an Independent Predictor of One-year Mortality After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 103, no. 7, 2009, pp. 902-6.
Ghazzal ZB, Dhawan SS, Sheikh A, et al. Usefulness of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as an independent predictor of one-year mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions. Am J Cardiol. 2009;103(7):902-6.
Ghazzal, Z. B., Dhawan, S. S., Sheikh, A., Douglas, J. S., Veledar, E., Mavromatis, K., Pohlel, F. K., & Vaccarino, V. (2009). Usefulness of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as an independent predictor of one-year mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions. The American Journal of Cardiology, 103(7), 902-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.11.053
Ghazzal ZB, et al. Usefulness of Serum High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level as an Independent Predictor of One-year Mortality After Percutaneous Coronary Interventions. Am J Cardiol. 2009 Apr 1;103(7):902-6. PubMed PMID: 19327413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Usefulness of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as an independent predictor of one-year mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions. AU - Ghazzal,Ziyad B, AU - Dhawan,Saurabh S, AU - Sheikh,Abdul, AU - Douglas,John S, AU - Veledar,Emir, AU - Mavromatis,Kreton, AU - Pohlel,F Khan, AU - Vaccarino,Viola, PY - 2008/07/16/received PY - 2008/11/20/revised PY - 2008/11/20/accepted PY - 2009/3/31/entrez PY - 2009/3/31/pubmed PY - 2009/4/15/medline SP - 902 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 103 IS - 7 N2 - Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are a marker of coronary artery disease progression and are associated with cardiovascular events. However, whether low HDL cholesterol is a useful prognostic indicator after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not known. In a sample of 4,088 patients who underwent PCI we evaluated 1-year mortality and repeat revascularization as a function of baseline HDL levels classified into approximate quartiles of very low (<35 mg/dl), low (35 to 40 mg/dl), medium (41 to 47 mg/dl) and high (48 to 120 mg/dl) HDL cholesterol. Decreasing levels of HDL cholesterol were associated with younger age, male gender, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and a history of bypass surgery (p <0.0001 for all). One-year mortality and coronary revascularization were significantly higher in the very low HDL cholesterol group compared with the other groups (very low HDL cholesterol 6.5% and 25.4%, respectively; low HDL cholesterol 3.1% and 20.8%; medium HDL cholesterol 4.3% and 22.7%; high HDL cholesterol 3.1% and 20.6%, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.007). One-year mortality was significantly higher in men with an HDL cholesterol level <33 mg/dL and in women with an HDL cholesterol level <38 mg/dL. In multivariable analysis, very low HDL was associated with nearly twofold the risk of death after adjusting for other independent predictors of outcome. In conclusion, in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI, a baseline HDL cholesterol level <35 mg/dl is an important prognostic indicator. Baseline HDL cholesterol levels <33 mg/dl for men and <38 mg/dl were associated with higher one-year mortality after PCI. SN - 1879-1913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19327413/Usefulness_of_serum_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_level_as_an_independent_predictor_of_one_year_mortality_after_percutaneous_coronary_interventions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(08)02172-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -