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Race, socioeconomic status, and premature mortality.
Minn Med. 2009 Feb; 92(2):40-3.MM

Abstract

This article summarizes the results of a study examining whether the relationship between race and premature mortality varied by socioeconomic status among men and women who are black or white and between the ages of 25 and 64 years. Using a population-based study design, we tested the hypothesis that the association between race and mortality would differ by socioeconomic status as measured by neighborhood poverty and educational status. We found that the odds of dying prematurely were greater for black men and women who lived in less-affluent neighborhoods than for white men and women who lived in similar neighborhoods. Racial differences were most striking, however, for both black women and white women who lived in more affluent neighborhoods. Our results suggest that socioeconomic status does moderate the effects of race on premature mortality. Strategies to reduce racial disparities in premature mortality in Minnesota must include developing more coordinated health, social, and economic policies and delivering health messages that resonate with younger, more affluent African-American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19331289

Citation

Jones-Webb, Rhonda, et al. "Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Premature Mortality." Minnesota Medicine, vol. 92, no. 2, 2009, pp. 40-3.
Jones-Webb R, Yu X, Wall M, et al. Race, socioeconomic status, and premature mortality. Minn Med. 2009;92(2):40-3.
Jones-Webb, R., Yu, X., Wall, M., Cui, Y., Hellerstedt, W., & Oswald, J. (2009). Race, socioeconomic status, and premature mortality. Minnesota Medicine, 92(2), 40-3.
Jones-Webb R, et al. Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Premature Mortality. Minn Med. 2009;92(2):40-3. PubMed PMID: 19331289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race, socioeconomic status, and premature mortality. AU - Jones-Webb,Rhonda, AU - Yu,Xinhua, AU - Wall,Melanie, AU - Cui,Yue, AU - Hellerstedt,Wendy, AU - Oswald,John, PY - 2009/4/1/entrez PY - 2009/4/1/pubmed PY - 2009/4/21/medline SP - 40 EP - 3 JF - Minnesota medicine JO - Minn Med VL - 92 IS - 2 N2 - This article summarizes the results of a study examining whether the relationship between race and premature mortality varied by socioeconomic status among men and women who are black or white and between the ages of 25 and 64 years. Using a population-based study design, we tested the hypothesis that the association between race and mortality would differ by socioeconomic status as measured by neighborhood poverty and educational status. We found that the odds of dying prematurely were greater for black men and women who lived in less-affluent neighborhoods than for white men and women who lived in similar neighborhoods. Racial differences were most striking, however, for both black women and white women who lived in more affluent neighborhoods. Our results suggest that socioeconomic status does moderate the effects of race on premature mortality. Strategies to reduce racial disparities in premature mortality in Minnesota must include developing more coordinated health, social, and economic policies and delivering health messages that resonate with younger, more affluent African-American women. SN - 0026-556X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19331289/Race_socioeconomic_status_and_premature_mortality_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -