Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A social disorganization perspective on bullying-related attitudes and behaviors: the influence of school context.
Am J Community Psychol. 2009 Jun; 43(3-4):204-20.AJ

Abstract

Social disorganization theory suggests that certain school-level indicators of disorder may be important predictors of bullying-related attitudes and behaviors. Multilevel analyses were conducted on bullying-related attitudes and experiences among 22,178 students in 95 elementary and middle schools. The intraclass correlation coefficients indicated that 0.6-2% of the variance in victimization, 5-10% of the variance in retaliatory attitudes, 5-6% of the variance in perceptions of safety, and 0.9% of the variance in perpetration of bullying was associated with the clustering of students within schools. Although the specific associations varied somewhat for elementary schools as compared to middle schools, the hierarchical linear modeling analyses generally suggested that school-level indicators of disorder (e.g., student-teacher ratio, concentration of student poverty, suspension rate, and student mobility) were significant predictors of bullying-related attitudes and experiences. Student-level characteristics (i.e., sex, ethnicity, status in school) were also relevant to students' retaliatory attitudes, perceptions of safety, and involvement in bullying. Implications for school-based research and violence prevention are provided.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. cbradsha@jhsph.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19333749

Citation

Bradshaw, Catherine P., et al. "A Social Disorganization Perspective On Bullying-related Attitudes and Behaviors: the Influence of School Context." American Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 43, no. 3-4, 2009, pp. 204-20.
Bradshaw CP, Sawyer AL, O'Brennan LM. A social disorganization perspective on bullying-related attitudes and behaviors: the influence of school context. Am J Community Psychol. 2009;43(3-4):204-20.
Bradshaw, C. P., Sawyer, A. L., & O'Brennan, L. M. (2009). A social disorganization perspective on bullying-related attitudes and behaviors: the influence of school context. American Journal of Community Psychology, 43(3-4), 204-20. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-009-9240-1
Bradshaw CP, Sawyer AL, O'Brennan LM. A Social Disorganization Perspective On Bullying-related Attitudes and Behaviors: the Influence of School Context. Am J Community Psychol. 2009;43(3-4):204-20. PubMed PMID: 19333749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A social disorganization perspective on bullying-related attitudes and behaviors: the influence of school context. AU - Bradshaw,Catherine P, AU - Sawyer,Anne L, AU - O'Brennan,Lindsey M, PY - 2009/4/1/entrez PY - 2009/4/1/pubmed PY - 2009/8/18/medline SP - 204 EP - 20 JF - American journal of community psychology JO - Am J Community Psychol VL - 43 IS - 3-4 N2 - Social disorganization theory suggests that certain school-level indicators of disorder may be important predictors of bullying-related attitudes and behaviors. Multilevel analyses were conducted on bullying-related attitudes and experiences among 22,178 students in 95 elementary and middle schools. The intraclass correlation coefficients indicated that 0.6-2% of the variance in victimization, 5-10% of the variance in retaliatory attitudes, 5-6% of the variance in perceptions of safety, and 0.9% of the variance in perpetration of bullying was associated with the clustering of students within schools. Although the specific associations varied somewhat for elementary schools as compared to middle schools, the hierarchical linear modeling analyses generally suggested that school-level indicators of disorder (e.g., student-teacher ratio, concentration of student poverty, suspension rate, and student mobility) were significant predictors of bullying-related attitudes and experiences. Student-level characteristics (i.e., sex, ethnicity, status in school) were also relevant to students' retaliatory attitudes, perceptions of safety, and involvement in bullying. Implications for school-based research and violence prevention are provided. SN - 1573-2770 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19333749/A_social_disorganization_perspective_on_bullying_related_attitudes_and_behaviors:_the_influence_of_school_context_ L2 - https://www.springerlink.com/10.1007/s10464-009-9240-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -