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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of French travelers from Marseille regarding rabies risk and prevention.
J Travel Med. 2009 Mar-Apr; 16(2):107-11.JT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the awareness of the mode of rabies transmission, travel-associated rabies risk, and adequate preventive measures among French travelers.

METHODS

Three hundred travelers were administered a detailed questionnaire prior to pretravel advice, addressing their knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) with respect to animal-related injuries and rabies risk. Two hundred and nine were administered a post-travel questionnaire by telephone, addressing the occurrence of contacts with animals during travel.

RESULTS

Countries visited were at risk for rabies in 84.7% of the cases. Only 6.7% of travelers knew that the risk of rabies was important, while 40.1% considered it moderate or low. Dog bites appeared to be a well-known mode of transmission of rabies. By contrast, licks on broken skin or contamination of the mucous membrane with saliva (10%) and scratches (0.7%) were rarely known. Cats (23.7%), foxes (28.3%), monkeys (10.3%), and bats (5.0%) were rarely mentioned as possible rabies vectors. Only 50.7% of travelers were aware of the preventive vaccination. Approximately 57.6% of individuals traveling to rabies-endemic countries presented to the clinic less than 21 days before departing, rendering a complete preventive vaccination against rabies unfeasible. Immediate washing of the injury with water and soap was mentioned by only 3.0% of individuals and self-disinfection with antiseptics by 21.3%. Of those who traveled in a rabies-risk country, 3.8% declared that they had been attacked by animals; however, none was injured. Animal encounters were frequent with dogs (53.8%), monkeys (39.5%), bats (17.9%), and cats (15.4%).

CONCLUSIONS

The KAP of French travelers with regard to travel-associated rabies risk need to be improved, particularly regarding the prevention of animal bites, postbite measures, and their urgency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19335810

Citation

Altmann, Matthias, et al. "Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of French Travelers From Marseille Regarding Rabies Risk and Prevention." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 16, no. 2, 2009, pp. 107-11.
Altmann M, Parola P, Delmont J, et al. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of French travelers from Marseille regarding rabies risk and prevention. J Travel Med. 2009;16(2):107-11.
Altmann, M., Parola, P., Delmont, J., Brouqui, P., & Gautret, P. (2009). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of French travelers from Marseille regarding rabies risk and prevention. Journal of Travel Medicine, 16(2), 107-11. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2008.00283.x
Altmann M, et al. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of French Travelers From Marseille Regarding Rabies Risk and Prevention. J Travel Med. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):107-11. PubMed PMID: 19335810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of French travelers from Marseille regarding rabies risk and prevention. AU - Altmann,Matthias, AU - Parola,Philippe, AU - Delmont,Jean, AU - Brouqui,Philippe, AU - Gautret,Philippe, PY - 2009/4/2/entrez PY - 2009/4/2/pubmed PY - 2009/8/6/medline SP - 107 EP - 11 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 16 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the awareness of the mode of rabies transmission, travel-associated rabies risk, and adequate preventive measures among French travelers. METHODS: Three hundred travelers were administered a detailed questionnaire prior to pretravel advice, addressing their knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) with respect to animal-related injuries and rabies risk. Two hundred and nine were administered a post-travel questionnaire by telephone, addressing the occurrence of contacts with animals during travel. RESULTS: Countries visited were at risk for rabies in 84.7% of the cases. Only 6.7% of travelers knew that the risk of rabies was important, while 40.1% considered it moderate or low. Dog bites appeared to be a well-known mode of transmission of rabies. By contrast, licks on broken skin or contamination of the mucous membrane with saliva (10%) and scratches (0.7%) were rarely known. Cats (23.7%), foxes (28.3%), monkeys (10.3%), and bats (5.0%) were rarely mentioned as possible rabies vectors. Only 50.7% of travelers were aware of the preventive vaccination. Approximately 57.6% of individuals traveling to rabies-endemic countries presented to the clinic less than 21 days before departing, rendering a complete preventive vaccination against rabies unfeasible. Immediate washing of the injury with water and soap was mentioned by only 3.0% of individuals and self-disinfection with antiseptics by 21.3%. Of those who traveled in a rabies-risk country, 3.8% declared that they had been attacked by animals; however, none was injured. Animal encounters were frequent with dogs (53.8%), monkeys (39.5%), bats (17.9%), and cats (15.4%). CONCLUSIONS: The KAP of French travelers with regard to travel-associated rabies risk need to be improved, particularly regarding the prevention of animal bites, postbite measures, and their urgency. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19335810/Knowledge_attitudes_and_practices_of_French_travelers_from_Marseille_regarding_rabies_risk_and_prevention_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2008.00283.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -