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PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event:an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2.
Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010 Jan; 23(1):119-26.AS

Abstract

To qualify for a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) requires that individuals report experiencing dominant emotions of fear, helplessness, and horror during the trauma (Criterion A2). Despite this stipulation, traumatic events can elicit a myriad of emotions other than fear, such as anger, guilt or shame, sadness, and numbing. The present study examined which emotional reactions to a stressful event in a college student sample are associated with the highest levels of PTSD symptoms. Our results suggest mixed support for the DSM-IV criteria. Although, participants who experienced a dominant emotion of fear reported relatively high PTSD symptomatology, participants who experience danger, disgust-related emotions, and sadness reported PTSD symptoms of equivalent severity. Additionally, participants reported dominant emotions of sadness and other emotions (including disgust, guilt, and shame) more frequently than they reported fear. These results question the specifics of diagnostic Criterion A2 and may have diagnostic and treatment implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19337884

Citation

Hathaway, Lisa M., et al. "PTSD Symptoms and Dominant Emotional Response to a Traumatic Event:an Examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2." Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, vol. 23, no. 1, 2010, pp. 119-26.
Hathaway LM, Boals A, Banks JB. PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event:an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2. Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010;23(1):119-26.
Hathaway, L. M., Boals, A., & Banks, J. B. (2010). PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event:an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2. Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, 23(1), 119-26. https://doi.org/10.1080/10615800902818771
Hathaway LM, Boals A, Banks JB. PTSD Symptoms and Dominant Emotional Response to a Traumatic Event:an Examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2. Anxiety Stress Coping. 2010;23(1):119-26. PubMed PMID: 19337884.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event:an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2. AU - Hathaway,Lisa M, AU - Boals,Adriel, AU - Banks,Jonathan B, PY - 2009/4/2/entrez PY - 2009/4/2/pubmed PY - 2010/2/20/medline SP - 119 EP - 26 JF - Anxiety, stress, and coping JO - Anxiety Stress Coping VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - To qualify for a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) requires that individuals report experiencing dominant emotions of fear, helplessness, and horror during the trauma (Criterion A2). Despite this stipulation, traumatic events can elicit a myriad of emotions other than fear, such as anger, guilt or shame, sadness, and numbing. The present study examined which emotional reactions to a stressful event in a college student sample are associated with the highest levels of PTSD symptoms. Our results suggest mixed support for the DSM-IV criteria. Although, participants who experienced a dominant emotion of fear reported relatively high PTSD symptomatology, participants who experience danger, disgust-related emotions, and sadness reported PTSD symptoms of equivalent severity. Additionally, participants reported dominant emotions of sadness and other emotions (including disgust, guilt, and shame) more frequently than they reported fear. These results question the specifics of diagnostic Criterion A2 and may have diagnostic and treatment implications. SN - 1477-2205 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19337884/PTSD_symptoms_and_dominant_emotional_response_to_a_traumatic_event:an_examination_of_DSM_IV_Criterion_A2_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10615800902818771 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -