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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Spain: molecular epidemiology and utility of different typing methods.
J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Jun; 47(6):1620-7.JC

Abstract

In a point-prevalence study performed in 145 Spanish hospitals in 2006, we collected 463 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in a single day. Of these, 135 (29.2%) were methicillin (meticillin)-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed by a microdilution method, and mecA was detected by PCR. The isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after SmaI digestion, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, agr typing, spa typing with BURP (based-upon-repeat-pattern) analysis, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The 135 MRSA isolates showed resistance to ciprofloxacin (93.3%), tobramycin (72.6%), gentamicin (20.0%), erythromycin (66.7%), and clindamycin (39.3%). Among the isolates resistant to erythromycin, 27.4% showed the M phenotype. All of the isolates were susceptible to glycopeptides. Twelve resistance patterns were found, of which four accounted for 65% of the isolates. PFGE revealed 36 different patterns, with 13 major clones (including 2 predominant clones with various antibiotypes that accounted for 52.5% of the MRSA isolates) and 23 sporadic profiles. Two genotypes were observed for the first time in Spain. SCCmec type IV accounted for 6.7% of the isolates (70.1% were type IVa, 23.9% were type IVc, 0.9% were type IVd, and 5.1% were type IVh), and SCCmec type I and SCCmec type II accounted for 7.4% and 5.2% of the isolates, respectively. One isolate was nontypeable. Only one of the isolates produced the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. The isolates presented agr type 2 (82.2%), type 1 (14.8%), and type 3 (3.0%). spa typing revealed 32 different types, the predominant ones being t067 (48.9%) and t002 (14.8%), as well as clonal complex 067 (78%) by BURP analysis. The MRSA clone of sequence type 125 and SCCmec type IV was the most prevalent throughout Spain. In our experience, PFGE, spa typing, SCCmec typing, and MLST presented good correlations for the majority of the MRSA strains; we suggest the use of spa typing and PFGE typing for epidemiological surveillance, since this combination is useful for both long-term and short-term studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19339473

Citation

Vindel, Ana, et al. "Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Spain: Molecular Epidemiology and Utility of Different Typing Methods." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 47, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1620-7.
Vindel A, Cuevas O, Cercenado E, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Spain: molecular epidemiology and utility of different typing methods. J Clin Microbiol. 2009;47(6):1620-7.
Vindel, A., Cuevas, O., Cercenado, E., Marcos, C., Bautista, V., Castellares, C., Trincado, P., Boquete, T., Pérez-Vázquez, M., Marín, M., & Bouza, E. (2009). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Spain: molecular epidemiology and utility of different typing methods. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 47(6), 1620-7. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01579-08
Vindel A, et al. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Spain: Molecular Epidemiology and Utility of Different Typing Methods. J Clin Microbiol. 2009;47(6):1620-7. PubMed PMID: 19339473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Spain: molecular epidemiology and utility of different typing methods. AU - Vindel,Ana, AU - Cuevas,Oscar, AU - Cercenado,Emilia, AU - Marcos,Carmen, AU - Bautista,Verónica, AU - Castellares,Carol, AU - Trincado,Pilar, AU - Boquete,Teresa, AU - Pérez-Vázquez,Maria, AU - Marín,Mercedes, AU - Bouza,Emilio, AU - ,, Y1 - 2009/04/01/ PY - 2009/4/3/entrez PY - 2009/4/3/pubmed PY - 2009/7/17/medline SP - 1620 EP - 7 JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J Clin Microbiol VL - 47 IS - 6 N2 - In a point-prevalence study performed in 145 Spanish hospitals in 2006, we collected 463 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in a single day. Of these, 135 (29.2%) were methicillin (meticillin)-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed by a microdilution method, and mecA was detected by PCR. The isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after SmaI digestion, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, agr typing, spa typing with BURP (based-upon-repeat-pattern) analysis, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The 135 MRSA isolates showed resistance to ciprofloxacin (93.3%), tobramycin (72.6%), gentamicin (20.0%), erythromycin (66.7%), and clindamycin (39.3%). Among the isolates resistant to erythromycin, 27.4% showed the M phenotype. All of the isolates were susceptible to glycopeptides. Twelve resistance patterns were found, of which four accounted for 65% of the isolates. PFGE revealed 36 different patterns, with 13 major clones (including 2 predominant clones with various antibiotypes that accounted for 52.5% of the MRSA isolates) and 23 sporadic profiles. Two genotypes were observed for the first time in Spain. SCCmec type IV accounted for 6.7% of the isolates (70.1% were type IVa, 23.9% were type IVc, 0.9% were type IVd, and 5.1% were type IVh), and SCCmec type I and SCCmec type II accounted for 7.4% and 5.2% of the isolates, respectively. One isolate was nontypeable. Only one of the isolates produced the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. The isolates presented agr type 2 (82.2%), type 1 (14.8%), and type 3 (3.0%). spa typing revealed 32 different types, the predominant ones being t067 (48.9%) and t002 (14.8%), as well as clonal complex 067 (78%) by BURP analysis. The MRSA clone of sequence type 125 and SCCmec type IV was the most prevalent throughout Spain. In our experience, PFGE, spa typing, SCCmec typing, and MLST presented good correlations for the majority of the MRSA strains; we suggest the use of spa typing and PFGE typing for epidemiological surveillance, since this combination is useful for both long-term and short-term studies. SN - 1098-660X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19339473/Methicillin_resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus_in_Spain:_molecular_epidemiology_and_utility_of_different_typing_methods_ L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19339473 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -