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Lower urinary tract symptoms in relation to lifestyle and medical conditions in Japanese workers.
Int J Urol 2009; 16(5):493-8; discussion 498IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association of medical conditions and lifestyle with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a population of Japanese male workers.

METHODS

A questionnaire survey on LUTS was conducted at the time of a periodic health examination among workers of a group of engineering and shipbuilding companies in Southern Kanto, Japan. A total of 1278 (85%) men responded. LUTS were assessed by using a modified International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire. Men having at least one point of the score were regarded as positive. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relation of the LUTS to age, smoking, drinking, body mass index, and medical treatment of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia.

RESULTS

Age was a strong determinant of LUTS. Men undergoing medical treatment for diabetes mellitus were significantly more likely to have LUTS than men without treatment (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.2). Increased odds of LUTS were also observed in men undergoing medical treatment for hypertension or dyslipidemia. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and obesity were not related to LUTS.

CONCLUSIONS

Our present findings, together with previous epidemiological and experimental evidence, suggest that LUTS might share common etiological factors with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Koukankai Tsurumi Occupational Health Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. tomita-sgy@umin.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19341367

Citation

Tomita, Kentaro, et al. "Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Relation to Lifestyle and Medical Conditions in Japanese Workers." International Journal of Urology : Official Journal of the Japanese Urological Association, vol. 16, no. 5, 2009, pp. 493-8; discussion 498.
Tomita K, Mizoue T, Matsumoto T. Lower urinary tract symptoms in relation to lifestyle and medical conditions in Japanese workers. Int J Urol. 2009;16(5):493-8; discussion 498.
Tomita, K., Mizoue, T., & Matsumoto, T. (2009). Lower urinary tract symptoms in relation to lifestyle and medical conditions in Japanese workers. International Journal of Urology : Official Journal of the Japanese Urological Association, 16(5), pp. 493-8; discussion 498. doi:10.1111/j.1442-2042.2009.02276.x.
Tomita K, Mizoue T, Matsumoto T. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Relation to Lifestyle and Medical Conditions in Japanese Workers. Int J Urol. 2009;16(5):493-8; discussion 498. PubMed PMID: 19341367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower urinary tract symptoms in relation to lifestyle and medical conditions in Japanese workers. AU - Tomita,Kentaro, AU - Mizoue,Tetsuya, AU - Matsumoto,Tetsuro, Y1 - 2009/04/01/ PY - 2009/4/4/entrez PY - 2009/4/4/pubmed PY - 2009/8/14/medline SP - 493-8; discussion 498 JF - International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association JO - Int. J. Urol. VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of medical conditions and lifestyle with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a population of Japanese male workers. METHODS: A questionnaire survey on LUTS was conducted at the time of a periodic health examination among workers of a group of engineering and shipbuilding companies in Southern Kanto, Japan. A total of 1278 (85%) men responded. LUTS were assessed by using a modified International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire. Men having at least one point of the score were regarded as positive. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relation of the LUTS to age, smoking, drinking, body mass index, and medical treatment of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. RESULTS: Age was a strong determinant of LUTS. Men undergoing medical treatment for diabetes mellitus were significantly more likely to have LUTS than men without treatment (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.2). Increased odds of LUTS were also observed in men undergoing medical treatment for hypertension or dyslipidemia. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and obesity were not related to LUTS. CONCLUSIONS: Our present findings, together with previous epidemiological and experimental evidence, suggest that LUTS might share common etiological factors with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. SN - 1442-2042 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19341367/Lower_urinary_tract_symptoms_in_relation_to_lifestyle_and_medical_conditions_in_Japanese_workers_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-2042.2009.02276.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -