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Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture--a 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study.
Osteoporos Int 2009; 20(11):1853-61OI

Abstract

Vitamin C may play a role in bone health. In the Framingham Study, subjects with higher total or supplemental vitamin C intake had fewer hip fractures and non-vertebral fractures as compared to subjects with lower intakes. Therefore, vitamin C may have a protective effect on bone health in older adults.

INTRODUCTION

Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin C may play a role in bone health. We evaluated associations of vitamin C intake (total, dietary, and supplemental) with incident hip fracture and non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture, over a 15- to 17-year follow-up, in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study.

METHODS

Three hundred and sixty-six men and 592 women (mean age 75 +/- 5 years) completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in 1988-1989 and were followed for non-vertebral fracture until 2003 and hip fracture until 2005. Tertiles of vitamin C intake were created from estimates obtained using the Willett FFQ, after adjusting for total energy (residual method). Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox-proportional hazards regression, adjusting for covariates.

RESULTS

Over follow-up 100 hip fractures occurred. Subjects in the highest tertile of total vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures (P trend = 0.04) and non-vertebral fractures (P trend = 0.05) compared to subjects in the lowest tertile of intake. Subjects in the highest category of supplemental vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures (P trend = 0.02) and non-vertebral fractures (P trend = 0.07) compared to non-supplement users. Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with fracture risk (all P > 0.22).

CONCLUSION

These results suggest a possible protective effect of vitamin C on bone health in older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dietary Assessment and Epidemiology Research Program, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (FSNSP), Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19347239

Citation

Sahni, S, et al. "Protective Effect of Total and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake On the Risk of Hip Fracture--a 17-year Follow-up From the Framingham Osteoporosis Study." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 20, no. 11, 2009, pp. 1853-61.
Sahni S, Hannan MT, Gagnon D, et al. Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture--a 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Osteoporos Int. 2009;20(11):1853-61.
Sahni, S., Hannan, M. T., Gagnon, D., Blumberg, J., Cupples, L. A., Kiel, D. P., & Tucker, K. L. (2009). Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture--a 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 20(11), pp. 1853-61. doi:10.1007/s00198-009-0897-y.
Sahni S, et al. Protective Effect of Total and Supplemental Vitamin C Intake On the Risk of Hip Fracture--a 17-year Follow-up From the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Osteoporos Int. 2009;20(11):1853-61. PubMed PMID: 19347239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture--a 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. AU - Sahni,S, AU - Hannan,M T, AU - Gagnon,D, AU - Blumberg,J, AU - Cupples,L A, AU - Kiel,D P, AU - Tucker,K L, Y1 - 2009/04/04/ PY - 2008/10/15/received PY - 2009/01/14/accepted PY - 2009/4/7/entrez PY - 2009/4/7/pubmed PY - 2011/1/12/medline SP - 1853 EP - 61 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 20 IS - 11 N2 - UNLABELLED: Vitamin C may play a role in bone health. In the Framingham Study, subjects with higher total or supplemental vitamin C intake had fewer hip fractures and non-vertebral fractures as compared to subjects with lower intakes. Therefore, vitamin C may have a protective effect on bone health in older adults. INTRODUCTION: Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin C may play a role in bone health. We evaluated associations of vitamin C intake (total, dietary, and supplemental) with incident hip fracture and non-vertebral osteoporotic fracture, over a 15- to 17-year follow-up, in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. METHODS: Three hundred and sixty-six men and 592 women (mean age 75 +/- 5 years) completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in 1988-1989 and were followed for non-vertebral fracture until 2003 and hip fracture until 2005. Tertiles of vitamin C intake were created from estimates obtained using the Willett FFQ, after adjusting for total energy (residual method). Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox-proportional hazards regression, adjusting for covariates. RESULTS: Over follow-up 100 hip fractures occurred. Subjects in the highest tertile of total vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures (P trend = 0.04) and non-vertebral fractures (P trend = 0.05) compared to subjects in the lowest tertile of intake. Subjects in the highest category of supplemental vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures (P trend = 0.02) and non-vertebral fractures (P trend = 0.07) compared to non-supplement users. Dietary vitamin C intake was not associated with fracture risk (all P > 0.22). CONCLUSION: These results suggest a possible protective effect of vitamin C on bone health in older adults. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19347239/Protective_effect_of_total_and_supplemental_vitamin_C_intake_on_the_risk_of_hip_fracture__a_17_year_follow_up_from_the_Framingham_Osteoporosis_Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-009-0897-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -