Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of a proprietary protein supplement on recovery indices following resistance exercise in strength/power athletes.
Amino Acids. 2010 Mar; 38(3):771-8.AA

Abstract

The effect of 42 g of protein ingested pre- and post-exercise on recovery from an acute resistance exercise session was examined in 15 male strength/power athletes who were randomly divided into a supplement (SUP) or placebo (PL) group. Subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory (HPL) on four separate occasions (T1-T4). Maximal strength [one repetition-maximum (1-RM)] testing was performed during T1. During T2 subjects performed four sets of ten repetitions at 80% of their 1-RM in the squat, dead lift and barbell lunge exercises with 90 s of rest between each set. Blood draws occurred at baseline (BL), immediate and 15 min post-exercise to determine testosterone, cortisol and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations. Subjects reported back to the HPL 24 (T3) and 48 h (T4) post-exercise for a BL blood draw and to perform four sets of ten repetitions with 80% of 1-RM for the squat exercise only. No differences in the number of repetitions performed in the squat exercise were seen between the groups at T2. Relative to T2, PL performed significantly (P < 0.05) fewer repetitions than SUP at T3 and T4 (-9.5 +/- 5.5 repetitions vs. -3.3 +/- 3.6 during T3, respectively, and -10.5 +/- 8.2 repetitions vs. -2.3 +/- 2.9 repetitions during T4, respectively). No differences in hormonal measures were seen between the groups. CK concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated at T3 for both groups, but continued to elevate (P < 0.05) at T4 for PL only. No significant group differences were noted for CK at any time point. Results indicate that a proprietary protein SUP consumed before and after a resistance training session significantly contributes to improvements in exercise recovery 24 and 48 h post-exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, PO Box 7718, Ewing, NJ 08628-0718, USA. hoffmanj@tcnj.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19347247

Citation

Hoffman, Jay R., et al. "Effect of a Proprietary Protein Supplement On Recovery Indices Following Resistance Exercise in Strength/power Athletes." Amino Acids, vol. 38, no. 3, 2010, pp. 771-8.
Hoffman JR, Ratamess NA, Tranchina CP, et al. Effect of a proprietary protein supplement on recovery indices following resistance exercise in strength/power athletes. Amino Acids. 2010;38(3):771-8.
Hoffman, J. R., Ratamess, N. A., Tranchina, C. P., Rashti, S. L., Kang, J., & Faigenbaum, A. D. (2010). Effect of a proprietary protein supplement on recovery indices following resistance exercise in strength/power athletes. Amino Acids, 38(3), 771-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00726-009-0283-2
Hoffman JR, et al. Effect of a Proprietary Protein Supplement On Recovery Indices Following Resistance Exercise in Strength/power Athletes. Amino Acids. 2010;38(3):771-8. PubMed PMID: 19347247.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of a proprietary protein supplement on recovery indices following resistance exercise in strength/power athletes. AU - Hoffman,Jay R, AU - Ratamess,Nicholas A, AU - Tranchina,Christopher P, AU - Rashti,Stefanie L, AU - Kang,Jie, AU - Faigenbaum,Avery D, Y1 - 2009/04/04/ PY - 2008/10/03/received PY - 2009/03/20/accepted PY - 2009/4/7/entrez PY - 2009/4/7/pubmed PY - 2010/7/2/medline SP - 771 EP - 8 JF - Amino acids JO - Amino Acids VL - 38 IS - 3 N2 - The effect of 42 g of protein ingested pre- and post-exercise on recovery from an acute resistance exercise session was examined in 15 male strength/power athletes who were randomly divided into a supplement (SUP) or placebo (PL) group. Subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory (HPL) on four separate occasions (T1-T4). Maximal strength [one repetition-maximum (1-RM)] testing was performed during T1. During T2 subjects performed four sets of ten repetitions at 80% of their 1-RM in the squat, dead lift and barbell lunge exercises with 90 s of rest between each set. Blood draws occurred at baseline (BL), immediate and 15 min post-exercise to determine testosterone, cortisol and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations. Subjects reported back to the HPL 24 (T3) and 48 h (T4) post-exercise for a BL blood draw and to perform four sets of ten repetitions with 80% of 1-RM for the squat exercise only. No differences in the number of repetitions performed in the squat exercise were seen between the groups at T2. Relative to T2, PL performed significantly (P < 0.05) fewer repetitions than SUP at T3 and T4 (-9.5 +/- 5.5 repetitions vs. -3.3 +/- 3.6 during T3, respectively, and -10.5 +/- 8.2 repetitions vs. -2.3 +/- 2.9 repetitions during T4, respectively). No differences in hormonal measures were seen between the groups. CK concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated at T3 for both groups, but continued to elevate (P < 0.05) at T4 for PL only. No significant group differences were noted for CK at any time point. Results indicate that a proprietary protein SUP consumed before and after a resistance training session significantly contributes to improvements in exercise recovery 24 and 48 h post-exercise. SN - 1438-2199 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19347247/Effect_of_a_proprietary_protein_supplement_on_recovery_indices_following_resistance_exercise_in_strength/power_athletes_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-009-0283-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -