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Attitudes of nurses toward current and proposed vaccines for public programs: a questionnaire survey.
Int J Nurs Stud. 2009 Sep; 46(9):1219-35.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In most countries registered nurses play a key role in vaccination. The number of recommended childhood vaccines has increased and several other new vaccines are in the implementation phase or are being considered for public programs. Little is known about nurses' perceived usefulness of recommended vaccines and no recent study has assessed nurses' opinions regarding new candidate vaccines for the public programs.

OBJECTIVES

The main purpose of this survey was to assess nurses' opinions regarding already recommended and new candidate vaccines for public programs; based on nurses responses, to assess the perceived priority of implementation of new vaccination programs, and to determine factors associated with the intention to recommend a new vaccine.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

The survey was conducted in June-July 2008 with registered nurses (N=299) randomly sampled from the Quebec Order of Nurses registry.

RESULTS

The great majority (97.8%) of nurses somewhat or strongly agreed that the vaccines recommended by public health authorities are very useful. The proportion of nurses that perceived different recommended vaccines as useful varied from 80% to 99%. A high heterogeneity was observed among nurses' opinions regarding the safety and efficacy profile of different new vaccines. From 35% to 69% of nurses self-estimated the information they received on new vaccines as sufficient for their needs. The priority rating of new vaccines was as follows: (1) combined hepatitis A and B vaccine; (2) measles mumps rubella and varicella vaccine; (3) hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis based vaccine; (4) pneumococcal 10-valent vaccine; (5) meningococcal ACYW-135 vaccine; (6) human papillomavirus vaccine and (7) Rotaviral vaccine. The willingness to recommend a new vaccine was consistently associated with the perceived vaccine safety, usefulness of a potential immunization program and the perceived professional support of a new vaccine.

CONCLUSION

The general attitudes of nurses toward vaccines recommended by public health authorities are positive and were not negatively affected by the recent implementation of the pneumococcal, varicella and influenza vaccines in the childhood vaccination program. Important differences are observed when comparing the perceived usefulness, safety, efficacy, acceptability, and intention to recommend new vaccines. Nurses clearly give their priority to combined vaccines and to vaccines they had received more information about. The delivery of clear evidence-based information about the new immunization program targets and vaccine safety, as well as professional support fostering would increase nurses' willingness to recommend new vaccines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Quebec Public Health Institute, Canada. vladimir.gilca@ssss.gouv.qc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19349047

Citation

Gilca, Vladimir, et al. "Attitudes of Nurses Toward Current and Proposed Vaccines for Public Programs: a Questionnaire Survey." International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 46, no. 9, 2009, pp. 1219-35.
Gilca V, Boulianne N, Dubé E, et al. Attitudes of nurses toward current and proposed vaccines for public programs: a questionnaire survey. Int J Nurs Stud. 2009;46(9):1219-35.
Gilca, V., Boulianne, N., Dubé, E., Sauvageau, C., & Ouakki, M. (2009). Attitudes of nurses toward current and proposed vaccines for public programs: a questionnaire survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 46(9), 1219-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.02.013
Gilca V, et al. Attitudes of Nurses Toward Current and Proposed Vaccines for Public Programs: a Questionnaire Survey. Int J Nurs Stud. 2009;46(9):1219-35. PubMed PMID: 19349047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attitudes of nurses toward current and proposed vaccines for public programs: a questionnaire survey. AU - Gilca,Vladimir, AU - Boulianne,Nicole, AU - Dubé,Eve, AU - Sauvageau,Chantal, AU - Ouakki,Manale, Y1 - 2009/04/05/ PY - 2008/10/31/received PY - 2009/01/09/revised PY - 2009/02/28/accepted PY - 2009/4/8/entrez PY - 2009/4/8/pubmed PY - 2009/10/23/medline SP - 1219 EP - 35 JF - International journal of nursing studies JO - Int J Nurs Stud VL - 46 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: In most countries registered nurses play a key role in vaccination. The number of recommended childhood vaccines has increased and several other new vaccines are in the implementation phase or are being considered for public programs. Little is known about nurses' perceived usefulness of recommended vaccines and no recent study has assessed nurses' opinions regarding new candidate vaccines for the public programs. OBJECTIVES: The main purpose of this survey was to assess nurses' opinions regarding already recommended and new candidate vaccines for public programs; based on nurses responses, to assess the perceived priority of implementation of new vaccination programs, and to determine factors associated with the intention to recommend a new vaccine. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The survey was conducted in June-July 2008 with registered nurses (N=299) randomly sampled from the Quebec Order of Nurses registry. RESULTS: The great majority (97.8%) of nurses somewhat or strongly agreed that the vaccines recommended by public health authorities are very useful. The proportion of nurses that perceived different recommended vaccines as useful varied from 80% to 99%. A high heterogeneity was observed among nurses' opinions regarding the safety and efficacy profile of different new vaccines. From 35% to 69% of nurses self-estimated the information they received on new vaccines as sufficient for their needs. The priority rating of new vaccines was as follows: (1) combined hepatitis A and B vaccine; (2) measles mumps rubella and varicella vaccine; (3) hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis based vaccine; (4) pneumococcal 10-valent vaccine; (5) meningococcal ACYW-135 vaccine; (6) human papillomavirus vaccine and (7) Rotaviral vaccine. The willingness to recommend a new vaccine was consistently associated with the perceived vaccine safety, usefulness of a potential immunization program and the perceived professional support of a new vaccine. CONCLUSION: The general attitudes of nurses toward vaccines recommended by public health authorities are positive and were not negatively affected by the recent implementation of the pneumococcal, varicella and influenza vaccines in the childhood vaccination program. Important differences are observed when comparing the perceived usefulness, safety, efficacy, acceptability, and intention to recommend new vaccines. Nurses clearly give their priority to combined vaccines and to vaccines they had received more information about. The delivery of clear evidence-based information about the new immunization program targets and vaccine safety, as well as professional support fostering would increase nurses' willingness to recommend new vaccines. SN - 1873-491X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19349047/Attitudes_of_nurses_toward_current_and_proposed_vaccines_for_public_programs:_a_questionnaire_survey_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -