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Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr; 163(4):336-43.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the net caloric impact from replacing sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with alternatives in children and adolescents in naturalistic settings.

DESIGN

Secondary analysis based on nationally representative cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Fixed-effect regression analysis of 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data.

PARTICIPANTS

Children and adolescents 2 to 19 years of age (N = 3098).

MAIN EXPOSURES

Within-person beverage consumption between 2 surveyed days.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The association between changes in the consumption of SSBs and other beverages and changes in total energy intake (TEI) of the same individual.

RESULTS

Each additional serving (8 oz) of SSB corresponded to a net increase of 106 kcal/d (P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 91 to 121 kcal/d), holding other beverages constant. Increases were also seen (all P < .001) for each additional serving of whole milk (169 kcal/d; 95% CI, 143 to 195 kcal/d), reduced-fat milk (145 kcal/d; 95% CI, 118 to 171 kcal/d), and 100% juice (123 kcal/d; 95% CI, 90 to 157 kcal/d). No net increases in TEI were seen for water (8 kcal/d; P = .27; 95% CI, -6 to 22 kcal/d) or diet drinks (47 kcal/d; P = .20; 95% CI, -23 to 117 kcal/d). Substituting SSBs with water was associated with a significant decrease in TEI, controlling for intake of other beverages, total beverage and nonbeverages, and fast-food and weekend effects. Each 1% of beverage replacement was associated with 6.6-kcal lower TEI, a reduction not negated by compensatory increases in other food or beverages. We estimate that replacing all SSBs with water could result in an average reduction of 235 kcal/d.

CONCLUSION

Replacing SSB intake with water is associated with reductions in total calories for all groups studied.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Policy and Management, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, 600 W 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. ycw2102@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19349562

Citation

Wang, Y Claire, et al. "Impact of Change in Sweetened Caloric Beverage Consumption On Energy Intake Among Children and Adolescents." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 163, no. 4, 2009, pp. 336-43.
Wang YC, Ludwig DS, Sonneville K, et al. Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):336-43.
Wang, Y. C., Ludwig, D. S., Sonneville, K., & Gortmaker, S. L. (2009). Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 163(4), 336-43. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.23
Wang YC, et al. Impact of Change in Sweetened Caloric Beverage Consumption On Energy Intake Among Children and Adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):336-43. PubMed PMID: 19349562.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of change in sweetened caloric beverage consumption on energy intake among children and adolescents. AU - Wang,Y Claire, AU - Ludwig,David S, AU - Sonneville,Kendrin, AU - Gortmaker,Steven L, PY - 2009/4/8/entrez PY - 2009/4/8/pubmed PY - 2009/5/5/medline SP - 336 EP - 43 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 163 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate the net caloric impact from replacing sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with alternatives in children and adolescents in naturalistic settings. DESIGN: Secondary analysis based on nationally representative cross-sectional study. SETTING: Fixed-effect regression analysis of 2 nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. PARTICIPANTS: Children and adolescents 2 to 19 years of age (N = 3098). MAIN EXPOSURES: Within-person beverage consumption between 2 surveyed days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The association between changes in the consumption of SSBs and other beverages and changes in total energy intake (TEI) of the same individual. RESULTS: Each additional serving (8 oz) of SSB corresponded to a net increase of 106 kcal/d (P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 91 to 121 kcal/d), holding other beverages constant. Increases were also seen (all P < .001) for each additional serving of whole milk (169 kcal/d; 95% CI, 143 to 195 kcal/d), reduced-fat milk (145 kcal/d; 95% CI, 118 to 171 kcal/d), and 100% juice (123 kcal/d; 95% CI, 90 to 157 kcal/d). No net increases in TEI were seen for water (8 kcal/d; P = .27; 95% CI, -6 to 22 kcal/d) or diet drinks (47 kcal/d; P = .20; 95% CI, -23 to 117 kcal/d). Substituting SSBs with water was associated with a significant decrease in TEI, controlling for intake of other beverages, total beverage and nonbeverages, and fast-food and weekend effects. Each 1% of beverage replacement was associated with 6.6-kcal lower TEI, a reduction not negated by compensatory increases in other food or beverages. We estimate that replacing all SSBs with water could result in an average reduction of 235 kcal/d. CONCLUSION: Replacing SSB intake with water is associated with reductions in total calories for all groups studied. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19349562/Impact_of_change_in_sweetened_caloric_beverage_consumption_on_energy_intake_among_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.23 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -