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Effects of individual components, time, and sex on prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine selected clinical characteristics for cohorts of similar adolescents over 4 survey periods from 1999-2006, to examine changes in rates of adolescents who exceed cutoff points for individual components of metabolic syndrome (MetS), to describe sex differences in individual components of MetS, to describe changes in MetS prevalence from 1999-2006 using 4 common MetS definitions, and to describe sex differences in MetS prevalence from 1999-2006.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional, US representational National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999-2006.

SETTING

Mobile examination centers conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

PARTICIPANTS

For 1999-2000, 613 adolescents (aged 12-19 years); for 2001-2002, 892 adolescents; for 2003-2004, 857 adolescents; and for 2005-2006, 814 adolescents. Exclusions were pregnancy, taking insulin or diabetic pills, and incomplete measurements.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Fasting plasma glucose level, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures.

RESULTS

Increases in fasting plasma glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreases in diastolic blood pressure were observed. Rates of adolescents exceeding cutoff points for fasting plasma glucose levels have increased. Compared with girls, adolescent boys had higher rates exceeding cutoff points for fasting plasma glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Adolescent girls had higher rates exceeding cutoff points for waist circumference. The prevalence of MetS among adolescents has not changed. No sex differences in MetS prevalence were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Some criteria for MetS have remained stable (triglyceride level and systolic blood pressure) and one has improved for boys (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level), but waist circumference has increased in girls and the rate of an elevated fasting plasma glucose level has nearly doubled for both boys and girls. Adolescent MetS prevalence has remained stable from 1999-2006.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Washington State University College of Nursing, Spokane, WA 99210-1495, USA. kdaratha@wsu.edu

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Blood Glucose
    Blood Pressure Determination
    Body Composition
    Body Mass Index
    Child
    Confidence Intervals
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Nutrition Surveys
    Prevalence
    Prognosis
    Risk Factors
    Severity of Illness Index
    Sex Distribution
    Time Factors
    United States
    Waist Circumference
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19349566

    Citation

    Daratha, Kenn B., and Ruth C. Bindler. "Effects of Individual Components, Time, and Sex On Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 163, no. 4, 2009, pp. 365-70.
    Daratha KB, Bindler RC. Effects of individual components, time, and sex on prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):365-70.
    Daratha, K. B., & Bindler, R. C. (2009). Effects of individual components, time, and sex on prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 163(4), pp. 365-70. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.6.
    Daratha KB, Bindler RC. Effects of Individual Components, Time, and Sex On Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009;163(4):365-70. PubMed PMID: 19349566.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of individual components, time, and sex on prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. AU - Daratha,Kenn B, AU - Bindler,Ruth C, PY - 2009/4/8/entrez PY - 2009/4/8/pubmed PY - 2009/5/5/medline SP - 365 EP - 70 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 163 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine selected clinical characteristics for cohorts of similar adolescents over 4 survey periods from 1999-2006, to examine changes in rates of adolescents who exceed cutoff points for individual components of metabolic syndrome (MetS), to describe sex differences in individual components of MetS, to describe changes in MetS prevalence from 1999-2006 using 4 common MetS definitions, and to describe sex differences in MetS prevalence from 1999-2006. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, US representational National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999-2006. SETTING: Mobile examination centers conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PARTICIPANTS: For 1999-2000, 613 adolescents (aged 12-19 years); for 2001-2002, 892 adolescents; for 2003-2004, 857 adolescents; and for 2005-2006, 814 adolescents. Exclusions were pregnancy, taking insulin or diabetic pills, and incomplete measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fasting plasma glucose level, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. RESULTS: Increases in fasting plasma glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreases in diastolic blood pressure were observed. Rates of adolescents exceeding cutoff points for fasting plasma glucose levels have increased. Compared with girls, adolescent boys had higher rates exceeding cutoff points for fasting plasma glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Adolescent girls had higher rates exceeding cutoff points for waist circumference. The prevalence of MetS among adolescents has not changed. No sex differences in MetS prevalence were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Some criteria for MetS have remained stable (triglyceride level and systolic blood pressure) and one has improved for boys (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level), but waist circumference has increased in girls and the rate of an elevated fasting plasma glucose level has nearly doubled for both boys and girls. Adolescent MetS prevalence has remained stable from 1999-2006. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19349566/Effects_of_individual_components_time_and_sex_on_prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -