Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Position but not color deviants result in visual mismatch negativity in an active oddball task.
Neuroreport. 2009 May 06; 20(7):702-7.N

Abstract

Changes in the visual environment might be detected automatically. This function is provided by the sensory systems and showed, for instance, by the pop-out phenomenon. Automatic change detection is also observable within visual oddball paradigms, where rare changes are introduced in an irrelevant stimulus feature; the detection of deviant stimuli is accompanied by a negative component (so-called visual mismatch negativity) in the human event-related brain potential. In this study, the deviating stimulus feature was embedded in a task-relevant object presented in the focus of attention. With this, visual mismatch negativity was observable only with position deviants presented in the upper visual half field but not by lower half field presentation or color deviants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department for Psychology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Mainz, Germany. berti@uni-mainz.de

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19349916

Citation

Berti, Stefan. "Position but Not Color Deviants Result in Visual Mismatch Negativity in an Active Oddball Task." Neuroreport, vol. 20, no. 7, 2009, pp. 702-7.
Berti S. Position but not color deviants result in visual mismatch negativity in an active oddball task. Neuroreport. 2009;20(7):702-7.
Berti, S. (2009). Position but not color deviants result in visual mismatch negativity in an active oddball task. Neuroreport, 20(7), 702-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32832a6e8d
Berti S. Position but Not Color Deviants Result in Visual Mismatch Negativity in an Active Oddball Task. Neuroreport. 2009 May 6;20(7):702-7. PubMed PMID: 19349916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Position but not color deviants result in visual mismatch negativity in an active oddball task. A1 - Berti,Stefan, PY - 2009/4/8/entrez PY - 2009/4/8/pubmed PY - 2009/6/17/medline SP - 702 EP - 7 JF - Neuroreport JO - Neuroreport VL - 20 IS - 7 N2 - Changes in the visual environment might be detected automatically. This function is provided by the sensory systems and showed, for instance, by the pop-out phenomenon. Automatic change detection is also observable within visual oddball paradigms, where rare changes are introduced in an irrelevant stimulus feature; the detection of deviant stimuli is accompanied by a negative component (so-called visual mismatch negativity) in the human event-related brain potential. In this study, the deviating stimulus feature was embedded in a task-relevant object presented in the focus of attention. With this, visual mismatch negativity was observable only with position deviants presented in the upper visual half field but not by lower half field presentation or color deviants. SN - 1473-558X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19349916/Position_but_not_color_deviants_result_in_visual_mismatch_negativity_in_an_active_oddball_task_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e32832a6e8d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -