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Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in women from opposite-sex twin pairs.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2009; 94(6):1987-90JC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Intrauterine androgens of a male fetus may influence the female fetus in opposite-sex twin pairs. Because female intrauterine overexposure to androgens could lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the prevalence of PCOS should be higher in women from opposite-sex twin pairs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence of PCOS in women from opposite-sex twin pairs compared to women from same-sex twin pairs, sisters, and female spouses of twins.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Data from 1325 monozygotic twins, 1191 dizygotic twins (711 women from same-sex twin pairs and 480 women from opposite-sex twin pairs), 745 sisters of twins, and 218 spouses of male twins were evaluated. PCOS was defined as less than nine natural menstrual cycles a year combined with either hirsutism or acne. The prevalence of PCOS was compared using a chi2 test. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to test for confounding effects of smoking, age, and body mass index.

RESULTS

No significant differences in PCOS prevalence were found between women from same-sex twin pairs (either monozygotic or dizygotic), opposite-sex twin pairs, sisters, and spouses.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of PCOS is not different in women from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs, singleton sisters, or spouses. This indicates that possible androgen exposure of the female fetus, caused by a shared intrauterine environment with a male fetus, does not result in PCOS-like traits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam 1007 MB, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19351727

Citation

Kuijper, Esther A M., et al. "Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Women From Opposite-sex Twin Pairs." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 94, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1987-90.
Kuijper EA, Vink JM, Lambalk CB, et al. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in women from opposite-sex twin pairs. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;94(6):1987-90.
Kuijper, E. A., Vink, J. M., Lambalk, C. B., & Boomsma, D. I. (2009). Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in women from opposite-sex twin pairs. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 94(6), pp. 1987-90. doi:10.1210/jc.2009-0191.
Kuijper EA, et al. Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Women From Opposite-sex Twin Pairs. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;94(6):1987-90. PubMed PMID: 19351727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in women from opposite-sex twin pairs. AU - Kuijper,Esther A M, AU - Vink,Jacqueline M, AU - Lambalk,Cornelis B, AU - Boomsma,Dorret I, Y1 - 2009/04/07/ PY - 2009/4/9/entrez PY - 2009/4/9/pubmed PY - 2009/7/3/medline SP - 1987 EP - 90 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 94 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Intrauterine androgens of a male fetus may influence the female fetus in opposite-sex twin pairs. Because female intrauterine overexposure to androgens could lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the prevalence of PCOS should be higher in women from opposite-sex twin pairs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence of PCOS in women from opposite-sex twin pairs compared to women from same-sex twin pairs, sisters, and female spouses of twins. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Data from 1325 monozygotic twins, 1191 dizygotic twins (711 women from same-sex twin pairs and 480 women from opposite-sex twin pairs), 745 sisters of twins, and 218 spouses of male twins were evaluated. PCOS was defined as less than nine natural menstrual cycles a year combined with either hirsutism or acne. The prevalence of PCOS was compared using a chi2 test. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to test for confounding effects of smoking, age, and body mass index. RESULTS: No significant differences in PCOS prevalence were found between women from same-sex twin pairs (either monozygotic or dizygotic), opposite-sex twin pairs, sisters, and spouses. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of PCOS is not different in women from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs, singleton sisters, or spouses. This indicates that possible androgen exposure of the female fetus, caused by a shared intrauterine environment with a male fetus, does not result in PCOS-like traits. SN - 1945-7197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19351727/Prevalence_of_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_in_women_from_opposite_sex_twin_pairs_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2009-0191 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -