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Secondhand smoke and particulate matter exposure in the home.
Nicotine Tob Res. 2009 Jun; 11(6):635-41.NT

Abstract

With the increasing normative trend of clean indoor air laws prohibiting smoking in public places such as worksites and restaurants, the home is becoming the primary source of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, little empirical data indicate how SHS is distributed throughout homes and whether smoking in segregated areas offers protection. This project studied real-time data on levels of SHS in 9 homes in which smoking was permitted and in 3 smoke-free homes. Active sampling monitors were used to assess levels of PM(2.5), a marker for SHS, over a 3-day period. In smoking homes, one monitor was placed in the primary smoking area and another in a distal location, where smoking generally did not occur. Participants logged smoking and other activities that could affect air quality. In smoking homes, without assuming normality, the mean PM(2.5) level for the primary smoking areas was statistically significantly higher than that for distal areas (84 and 63 microg/m3, respectively). Both levels far surpassed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's annual standard of 15 microg/m3 for outdoor air quality. By contrast, the smoke-free home mean was 9 microg/m3, similar to outdoor air quality. These results suggest that the air in smoking homes was several times more polluted than that in smoke-free homes, regardless of where the measurements were taken, meaning that efforts to confine smoking to only part of the home offer no protection for people anywhere inside the home. Household members can be protected by implementing a smoke-free home policy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Behavior, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19351784

Citation

Van Deusen, Amy, et al. "Secondhand Smoke and Particulate Matter Exposure in the Home." Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 11, no. 6, 2009, pp. 635-41.
Van Deusen A, Hyland A, Travers MJ, et al. Secondhand smoke and particulate matter exposure in the home. Nicotine Tob Res. 2009;11(6):635-41.
Van Deusen, A., Hyland, A., Travers, M. J., Wang, C., Higbee, C., King, B. A., Alford, T., & Cummings, K. M. (2009). Secondhand smoke and particulate matter exposure in the home. Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, 11(6), 635-41. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntp018
Van Deusen A, et al. Secondhand Smoke and Particulate Matter Exposure in the Home. Nicotine Tob Res. 2009;11(6):635-41. PubMed PMID: 19351784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondhand smoke and particulate matter exposure in the home. AU - Van Deusen,Amy, AU - Hyland,Andrew, AU - Travers,Mark J, AU - Wang,Chong, AU - Higbee,Cheryl, AU - King,Brian A, AU - Alford,Terry, AU - Cummings,K Michael, Y1 - 2009/04/07/ PY - 2009/4/9/entrez PY - 2009/4/9/pubmed PY - 2009/8/20/medline SP - 635 EP - 41 JF - Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco JO - Nicotine Tob Res VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - With the increasing normative trend of clean indoor air laws prohibiting smoking in public places such as worksites and restaurants, the home is becoming the primary source of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. However, little empirical data indicate how SHS is distributed throughout homes and whether smoking in segregated areas offers protection. This project studied real-time data on levels of SHS in 9 homes in which smoking was permitted and in 3 smoke-free homes. Active sampling monitors were used to assess levels of PM(2.5), a marker for SHS, over a 3-day period. In smoking homes, one monitor was placed in the primary smoking area and another in a distal location, where smoking generally did not occur. Participants logged smoking and other activities that could affect air quality. In smoking homes, without assuming normality, the mean PM(2.5) level for the primary smoking areas was statistically significantly higher than that for distal areas (84 and 63 microg/m3, respectively). Both levels far surpassed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's annual standard of 15 microg/m3 for outdoor air quality. By contrast, the smoke-free home mean was 9 microg/m3, similar to outdoor air quality. These results suggest that the air in smoking homes was several times more polluted than that in smoke-free homes, regardless of where the measurements were taken, meaning that efforts to confine smoking to only part of the home offer no protection for people anywhere inside the home. Household members can be protected by implementing a smoke-free home policy. SN - 1469-994X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19351784/Secondhand_smoke_and_particulate_matter_exposure_in_the_home_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ntr/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ntr/ntp018 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -