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Student perceptions of the clinical laboratory science profession.
Clin Lab Sci. 2009 Winter; 22(1):16-21.CL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this paper is to describe the attitudes and perceptions among college biology and CLS/CLT students. These students were on selected college campuses at Texas universities in Houston, Dallas and the Austin/San Antonio areas for the Spring 2007 semester. Specifically, students were questioned on factors that influence their choice of field of study, career expectations, legislative measures which might be used to attract individuals to the career, and factors that will be required to keep them in the field of practice.

DESIGN

This study was part of a larger qualitative study which included exploratory discovery and inductive logic regarding the attitudes of four focus groups in Texas.

SETTING

Focus groups took place on college campuses or in hotel conference rooms.

PARTICIPANTS

(1) junior/senior-level college biology students and (2) junior/senior-level students currently enrolled in CLS/CLT programs.

INTERVENTIONS

Focus group discussions using a standard set of questions; group sessions lasted about 45 minutes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

This study was a qualitative study which included exploratory discovery and inductive logic regarding the attitudes of two groups in Texas.

RESULTS

College biology and CLS/CLT students find the clinical laboratory science profession to be interesting and exciting as a career prospect, however, many do not see themselves remaining in the profession and perceive it does not have good prospects for career advancement. The majority of students must work to support themselves through their college education and would welcome additional grants, scholarships and loan forgiveness programs as incentives to study the clinical laboratory sciences. Students believe that additional recruitment on high school and college campuses is needed to increase the visibility of the field as career choice.

CONCLUSION

The majority of students who are entering the clinical laboratory science profession do not see the profession as their final career choice, but rather a stepping stone to another career field in healthcare or a related field. The perception that the profession lacks a career ladder is a critical detriment to the retention of CLS/CLT professionals. The clinical laboratory science profession continues to suffer from a lack of knowledge about the field by the general public, college advisors, and even healthcare workers. State and national programs involving grants/scholarships or loan forgiveness programs offered by healthcare institutions would be beneficial in attracting students to study the clinical laboratory sciences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Laboratory Science Program, MD Anderson School of the Health Professions, Houston TX, USA. kmcclure@mdanderson.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19354023

Citation

McClure, Karen. "Student Perceptions of the Clinical Laboratory Science Profession." Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, vol. 22, no. 1, 2009, pp. 16-21.
McClure K. Student perceptions of the clinical laboratory science profession. Clin Lab Sci. 2009;22(1):16-21.
McClure, K. (2009). Student perceptions of the clinical laboratory science profession. Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, 22(1), 16-21.
McClure K. Student Perceptions of the Clinical Laboratory Science Profession. Clin Lab Sci. 2009;22(1):16-21. PubMed PMID: 19354023.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Student perceptions of the clinical laboratory science profession. A1 - McClure,Karen, PY - 2009/4/10/entrez PY - 2009/4/10/pubmed PY - 2009/4/29/medline SP - 16 EP - 21 JF - Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology JO - Clin Lab Sci VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper is to describe the attitudes and perceptions among college biology and CLS/CLT students. These students were on selected college campuses at Texas universities in Houston, Dallas and the Austin/San Antonio areas for the Spring 2007 semester. Specifically, students were questioned on factors that influence their choice of field of study, career expectations, legislative measures which might be used to attract individuals to the career, and factors that will be required to keep them in the field of practice. DESIGN: This study was part of a larger qualitative study which included exploratory discovery and inductive logic regarding the attitudes of four focus groups in Texas. SETTING: Focus groups took place on college campuses or in hotel conference rooms. PARTICIPANTS: (1) junior/senior-level college biology students and (2) junior/senior-level students currently enrolled in CLS/CLT programs. INTERVENTIONS: Focus group discussions using a standard set of questions; group sessions lasted about 45 minutes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: This study was a qualitative study which included exploratory discovery and inductive logic regarding the attitudes of two groups in Texas. RESULTS: College biology and CLS/CLT students find the clinical laboratory science profession to be interesting and exciting as a career prospect, however, many do not see themselves remaining in the profession and perceive it does not have good prospects for career advancement. The majority of students must work to support themselves through their college education and would welcome additional grants, scholarships and loan forgiveness programs as incentives to study the clinical laboratory sciences. Students believe that additional recruitment on high school and college campuses is needed to increase the visibility of the field as career choice. CONCLUSION: The majority of students who are entering the clinical laboratory science profession do not see the profession as their final career choice, but rather a stepping stone to another career field in healthcare or a related field. The perception that the profession lacks a career ladder is a critical detriment to the retention of CLS/CLT professionals. The clinical laboratory science profession continues to suffer from a lack of knowledge about the field by the general public, college advisors, and even healthcare workers. State and national programs involving grants/scholarships or loan forgiveness programs offered by healthcare institutions would be beneficial in attracting students to study the clinical laboratory sciences. SN - 0894-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19354023/Student_perceptions_of_the_clinical_laboratory_science_profession_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -