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Speech intelligibility in background noise with ideal binary time-frequency masking.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2009 Apr; 125(4):2336-47.JA

Abstract

Ideal binary time-frequency masking is a signal separation technique that retains mixture energy in time-frequency units where local signal-to-noise ratio exceeds a certain threshold and rejects mixture energy in other time-frequency units. Two experiments were designed to assess the effects of ideal binary masking on speech intelligibility of both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in different kinds of background interference. The results from Experiment 1 demonstrate that ideal binary masking leads to substantial reductions in speech-reception threshold for both NH and HI listeners, and the reduction is greater in a cafeteria background than in a speech-shaped noise. Furthermore, listeners with hearing loss benefit more than listeners with normal hearing, particularly for cafeteria noise, and ideal masking nearly equalizes the speech intelligibility performances of NH and HI listeners in noisy backgrounds. The results from Experiment 2 suggest that ideal binary masking in the low-frequency range yields larger intelligibility improvements than in the high-frequency range, especially for listeners with hearing loss. The findings from the two experiments have major implications for understanding speech perception in noise, computational auditory scene analysis, speech enhancement, and hearing aid design.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Computer Science & Engineering and Center for Cognitive Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19354408

Citation

Wang, DeLiang, et al. "Speech Intelligibility in Background Noise With Ideal Binary Time-frequency Masking." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 125, no. 4, 2009, pp. 2336-47.
Wang D, Kjems U, Pedersen MS, et al. Speech intelligibility in background noise with ideal binary time-frequency masking. J Acoust Soc Am. 2009;125(4):2336-47.
Wang, D., Kjems, U., Pedersen, M. S., Boldt, J. B., & Lunner, T. (2009). Speech intelligibility in background noise with ideal binary time-frequency masking. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 125(4), 2336-47. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3083233
Wang D, et al. Speech Intelligibility in Background Noise With Ideal Binary Time-frequency Masking. J Acoust Soc Am. 2009;125(4):2336-47. PubMed PMID: 19354408.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Speech intelligibility in background noise with ideal binary time-frequency masking. AU - Wang,DeLiang, AU - Kjems,Ulrik, AU - Pedersen,Michael S, AU - Boldt,Jesper B, AU - Lunner,Thomas, PY - 2009/4/10/entrez PY - 2009/4/10/pubmed PY - 2009/8/12/medline SP - 2336 EP - 47 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 125 IS - 4 N2 - Ideal binary time-frequency masking is a signal separation technique that retains mixture energy in time-frequency units where local signal-to-noise ratio exceeds a certain threshold and rejects mixture energy in other time-frequency units. Two experiments were designed to assess the effects of ideal binary masking on speech intelligibility of both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in different kinds of background interference. The results from Experiment 1 demonstrate that ideal binary masking leads to substantial reductions in speech-reception threshold for both NH and HI listeners, and the reduction is greater in a cafeteria background than in a speech-shaped noise. Furthermore, listeners with hearing loss benefit more than listeners with normal hearing, particularly for cafeteria noise, and ideal masking nearly equalizes the speech intelligibility performances of NH and HI listeners in noisy backgrounds. The results from Experiment 2 suggest that ideal binary masking in the low-frequency range yields larger intelligibility improvements than in the high-frequency range, especially for listeners with hearing loss. The findings from the two experiments have major implications for understanding speech perception in noise, computational auditory scene analysis, speech enhancement, and hearing aid design. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19354408/Speech_intelligibility_in_background_noise_with_ideal_binary_time_frequency_masking_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -