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Coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.
Lung Cancer. 2010 Jan; 67(1):17-22.LC

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have evaluated the potential association between coffee consumption and lung cancer risk. However, results were inconsistent. To clarify the role of coffee in lung cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis on this topic. We searched PubMed and EMBASE databases (from 1966 to January 2009) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using random-effects model. Five prospective studies and 8 case-control studies involving 5347 lung cancer cases and 104,911 non-cases were included in this meta-analysis. The combined results indicated a significant positive association between highest coffee intake and lung cancer [relative risk (RR)=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.54). Furthermore, an increase in coffee consumption of 2 cups/day was associated with a 14% increased risk of developing lung cancer (RR=1.14, 95% CI=1.04-1.26). In stratified analyses, the highest coffee consumption was significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer in prospective studies, studies conducted in America and Japan, but borderline significantly associated with decreased risk of lung cancer in non-smokers. In addition, decaffeinated coffee drinking was associated with decreased lung cancer risk, although the number of studies on this topic was relative small. In conclusion, results from this meta-analysis indicate that high or an increased consumption of coffee may increase the risk of lung cancer. Because the residual confounding effects of smoking or other factors may still exist, these results should be interpreted with caution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Shanghai Center for New Drug Safety Evaluation and Research, Shanghai Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry, 199 Guoshoujing Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Pudong, Shanghai 201203, China. naping.tang@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19362749

Citation

Tang, Naping, et al. "Coffee Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Meta-analysis." Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), vol. 67, no. 1, 2010, pp. 17-22.
Tang N, Wu Y, Ma J, et al. Coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis. Lung Cancer. 2010;67(1):17-22.
Tang, N., Wu, Y., Ma, J., Wang, B., & Yu, R. (2010). Coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis. Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 67(1), 17-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2009.03.012
Tang N, et al. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: a Meta-analysis. Lung Cancer. 2010;67(1):17-22. PubMed PMID: 19362749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer: a meta-analysis. AU - Tang,Naping, AU - Wu,Yuemin, AU - Ma,Jing, AU - Wang,Bin, AU - Yu,Rongbin, PY - 2009/01/07/received PY - 2009/03/08/revised PY - 2009/03/11/accepted PY - 2009/4/14/entrez PY - 2009/4/14/pubmed PY - 2010/2/24/medline SP - 17 EP - 22 JF - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) JO - Lung Cancer VL - 67 IS - 1 N2 - Epidemiologic studies have evaluated the potential association between coffee consumption and lung cancer risk. However, results were inconsistent. To clarify the role of coffee in lung cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis on this topic. We searched PubMed and EMBASE databases (from 1966 to January 2009) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using random-effects model. Five prospective studies and 8 case-control studies involving 5347 lung cancer cases and 104,911 non-cases were included in this meta-analysis. The combined results indicated a significant positive association between highest coffee intake and lung cancer [relative risk (RR)=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.54). Furthermore, an increase in coffee consumption of 2 cups/day was associated with a 14% increased risk of developing lung cancer (RR=1.14, 95% CI=1.04-1.26). In stratified analyses, the highest coffee consumption was significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer in prospective studies, studies conducted in America and Japan, but borderline significantly associated with decreased risk of lung cancer in non-smokers. In addition, decaffeinated coffee drinking was associated with decreased lung cancer risk, although the number of studies on this topic was relative small. In conclusion, results from this meta-analysis indicate that high or an increased consumption of coffee may increase the risk of lung cancer. Because the residual confounding effects of smoking or other factors may still exist, these results should be interpreted with caution. SN - 1872-8332 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19362749/Coffee_consumption_and_risk_of_lung_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0169-5002(09)00134-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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