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Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff.
Exp Clin Transplant. 2009 Mar; 7(1):1-7.EC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The ongoing development of live donor kidney transplant has generated many ethical dilemmas. It is important to be aware of the attitudes of transplant professionals involved in this practice.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

An anonymous and confidential questionnaire was sent to 236 members of the medical and nursing staff of the West London Renal and Transplant Centre, to assess their views on the ethics of the current practice of live donor kidney transplant.

RESULTS

Of the 236 questionnaires, 108 (45.8%) were returned. Respondents considered live donor kidney transplant ethically acceptable between blood relatives (100%), nonblood relatives and friends (92.6%), and strangers (47.2%). Most respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a blood relative (92.6%) or a nonblood relative or friend (81.5%), and 12.0% were willing to donate to a stranger. Considering themselves as potential recipients if they had end-stage renal disease, most would accept a kidney from a blood relative (91.7%) or nonblood relative or friend (85.2%),while 44.5% would accept a kidney from a stranger. The highest number of respondents (43.5%) believed that the recipient should approach the potential donor. About one-third believed there should be no financial reward, not even compensation for expenses, for donors; 8% favored direct financial rewards for donors known to recipients, and 18% favored rewards for donors not known to recipients. Slightly more than half were in favor of accepting donors with mild to moderate medical problems.

CONCLUSIONS

Live related and unrelated kidney donation are considered ethically acceptable procedures, and nondirected donation is gaining support among transplant professionals. A substantial minority favored direct financial rewards for donors, especially in the case of nondirected donation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

West London Renal and Transplant Centre, Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Institute, Hammersmith Hospital, DuCane Road, London W12 0HS, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19364304

Citation

Mazaris, Evangelos M., et al. "Ethical Issues in Live Donor Kidney Transplant: Views of Medical and Nursing Staff." Experimental and Clinical Transplantation : Official Journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation, vol. 7, no. 1, 2009, pp. 1-7.
Mazaris EM, Warrens AN, Papalois VE. Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff. Exp Clin Transplant. 2009;7(1):1-7.
Mazaris, E. M., Warrens, A. N., & Papalois, V. E. (2009). Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff. Experimental and Clinical Transplantation : Official Journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation, 7(1), 1-7.
Mazaris EM, Warrens AN, Papalois VE. Ethical Issues in Live Donor Kidney Transplant: Views of Medical and Nursing Staff. Exp Clin Transplant. 2009;7(1):1-7. PubMed PMID: 19364304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethical issues in live donor kidney transplant: views of medical and nursing staff. AU - Mazaris,Evangelos M, AU - Warrens,Anthony N, AU - Papalois,Vassilios E, PY - 2009/4/15/entrez PY - 2009/4/15/pubmed PY - 2009/6/26/medline SP - 1 EP - 7 JF - Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation JO - Exp Clin Transplant VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The ongoing development of live donor kidney transplant has generated many ethical dilemmas. It is important to be aware of the attitudes of transplant professionals involved in this practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous and confidential questionnaire was sent to 236 members of the medical and nursing staff of the West London Renal and Transplant Centre, to assess their views on the ethics of the current practice of live donor kidney transplant. RESULTS: Of the 236 questionnaires, 108 (45.8%) were returned. Respondents considered live donor kidney transplant ethically acceptable between blood relatives (100%), nonblood relatives and friends (92.6%), and strangers (47.2%). Most respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a blood relative (92.6%) or a nonblood relative or friend (81.5%), and 12.0% were willing to donate to a stranger. Considering themselves as potential recipients if they had end-stage renal disease, most would accept a kidney from a blood relative (91.7%) or nonblood relative or friend (85.2%),while 44.5% would accept a kidney from a stranger. The highest number of respondents (43.5%) believed that the recipient should approach the potential donor. About one-third believed there should be no financial reward, not even compensation for expenses, for donors; 8% favored direct financial rewards for donors known to recipients, and 18% favored rewards for donors not known to recipients. Slightly more than half were in favor of accepting donors with mild to moderate medical problems. CONCLUSIONS: Live related and unrelated kidney donation are considered ethically acceptable procedures, and nondirected donation is gaining support among transplant professionals. A substantial minority favored direct financial rewards for donors, especially in the case of nondirected donation. SN - 1304-0855 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19364304/Ethical_issues_in_live_donor_kidney_transplant:_views_of_medical_and_nursing_staff_ L2 - http://www.ectrx.org/forms/ectrxcontentshow.php?year=2009&volume=7&issue=1&supplement=0&makale_no=0&spage_number=1&content_type=FULL TEXT DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -