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A prospective study of meat, cooking methods, meat mutagens, heme iron, and lung cancer risks.
Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89(6):1884-94AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Red and processed meat consumption may play a role in lung cancer pathogenesis because of these meats' fat and carcinogen content.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively investigated whether meat type, cooking method, doneness level, and intake of specific meat mutagens and heme iron are associated with lung carcinoma.

DESIGN

Men (n = 278,380) and women (n = 189,596) from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study with no history of cancer at baseline were monitored for 8 y. Diet was assessed with a 124-item food-frequency questionnaire. A meat-cooking module was used to estimate the intake of individual heterocyclic amines, benzo(a)pyrene, and heme iron. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs.

RESULTS

In a comparison of quintiles 5 with 1 (Q5vsQ1), a high intake of red meat was associated with an increased risk of lung carcinoma in both men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.38; P for trend = 0.005) and women (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.13; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.32; P for trend = 0.05). A high intake of processed meat increased the risk only in men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.23; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.37; P for trend = 0.003). In an analysis stratified by smoking status, we observed a tendency for an increased risk with red meat intake in never smoking men and women; however, the risks were not statistically significant. In a comparison of tertiles 3 and 1 (T3vsT1), the risk of lung carcinoma was associated with intake of well-/very-well-done meat (HR(T3vsT1): 1.20; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.35; P for trend = 0.002) and the intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.20; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.38; P for trend = 0.04) in men. Heme iron intake increased the risk of lung carcinoma in both men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.25; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.45; P for trend = 0.02) and women (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.18; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.42; P for trend = 0.002).

CONCLUSION

We observed a moderate association between meat consumption and lung carcinoma, which might be explained by heme iron intake, high-temperature cooking, and associated mutagens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892-7242, USA. tasevskan@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19369370

Citation

Tasevska, Natasa, et al. "A Prospective Study of Meat, Cooking Methods, Meat Mutagens, Heme Iron, and Lung Cancer Risks." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1884-94.
Tasevska N, Sinha R, Kipnis V, et al. A prospective study of meat, cooking methods, meat mutagens, heme iron, and lung cancer risks. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1884-94.
Tasevska, N., Sinha, R., Kipnis, V., Subar, A. F., Leitzmann, M. F., Hollenbeck, A. R., ... Cross, A. J. (2009). A prospective study of meat, cooking methods, meat mutagens, heme iron, and lung cancer risks. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(6), pp. 1884-94. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.27272.
Tasevska N, et al. A Prospective Study of Meat, Cooking Methods, Meat Mutagens, Heme Iron, and Lung Cancer Risks. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1884-94. PubMed PMID: 19369370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of meat, cooking methods, meat mutagens, heme iron, and lung cancer risks. AU - Tasevska,Natasa, AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Kipnis,Victor, AU - Subar,Amy F, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Hollenbeck,Albert R, AU - Caporaso,Neil E, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Cross,Amanda J, Y1 - 2009/04/15/ PY - 2009/4/17/entrez PY - 2009/4/17/pubmed PY - 2009/6/13/medline SP - 1884 EP - 94 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 89 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Red and processed meat consumption may play a role in lung cancer pathogenesis because of these meats' fat and carcinogen content. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively investigated whether meat type, cooking method, doneness level, and intake of specific meat mutagens and heme iron are associated with lung carcinoma. DESIGN: Men (n = 278,380) and women (n = 189,596) from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study with no history of cancer at baseline were monitored for 8 y. Diet was assessed with a 124-item food-frequency questionnaire. A meat-cooking module was used to estimate the intake of individual heterocyclic amines, benzo(a)pyrene, and heme iron. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. RESULTS: In a comparison of quintiles 5 with 1 (Q5vsQ1), a high intake of red meat was associated with an increased risk of lung carcinoma in both men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.38; P for trend = 0.005) and women (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.13; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.32; P for trend = 0.05). A high intake of processed meat increased the risk only in men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.23; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.37; P for trend = 0.003). In an analysis stratified by smoking status, we observed a tendency for an increased risk with red meat intake in never smoking men and women; however, the risks were not statistically significant. In a comparison of tertiles 3 and 1 (T3vsT1), the risk of lung carcinoma was associated with intake of well-/very-well-done meat (HR(T3vsT1): 1.20; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.35; P for trend = 0.002) and the intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.20; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.38; P for trend = 0.04) in men. Heme iron intake increased the risk of lung carcinoma in both men (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.25; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.45; P for trend = 0.02) and women (HR(Q5vsQ1): 1.18; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.42; P for trend = 0.002). CONCLUSION: We observed a moderate association between meat consumption and lung carcinoma, which might be explained by heme iron intake, high-temperature cooking, and associated mutagens. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19369370/A_prospective_study_of_meat_cooking_methods_meat_mutagens_heme_iron_and_lung_cancer_risks_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27272 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -